November 29, 2010

Where is Jack Bauer when you need him?

The Morning Bell, “Just Another WikiLeak On An Already Sinking Ship”:

The President should [...] make it a publicly top priority to hunt down any American connected with these leaks and prosecute them. This is not the first WikiLeak. This is, in fact, the third time that WikiLeaks has undermined our nation’s national security, and the Obama Department of Justice has been silent each time. Nobody gets more cooperation than a winner. The Obama Administration can begin to right its foreign policy ship by stopping and successfully prosecuting the WikiLeakers.

With all due respect, this administration’s Justice Department can’t successfully prosecute actual terrorists. Think of how they’ll handle a leaker who, under other circumstances — say, like, when the target of exposure is a Republican administration — they’d be secretly cheering on.

I don’t know precisely when it was when we stopped treating treason as treason, but it’s about time we reconsidered our softening on that stance. Perhaps if the threat of real consequences — other than, say, international celebrity, and perpetual darling/hero status on the left — obtained to such actions, we’d see fewer instances of the kind of behavior that has no other real function than to destabilize the security of sovereign nations, and put the lives of soldiers, diplomats, and covert operatives at risk.

So yes. Read between the lines. Because I am indeed saying it.

Posted by Jeff G. @ 8:14am
119 comments | Trackback

Comments (119)

  1. It seems to me that the threat of embarrassment to FROTUS is much more of a catalyst than, say, danger to soldiers. That’s why he’s speaking today. If you close your eyes, you might be transported back to “Fat Albert and Friends”.

  2. These people don’t die after the fact. But we’ll never know how many such incidents have been prevented by deploying specially-trained teams of attack bats.

  3. . . . when we stopped treating treason as treason . . .

    My reckoning is shortly after the polity fell into schism over the ends to which the whole enterprise is directed. Surely the inability to meaningfully distinguish is associated to the confusion of purpose generated therein, no?

  4. When did treason become fashionable? Like everything else that’s trended hard Left, the late ’60 and early ’70′s. e.g.

  5. I’m probably alone in thinking this, but: While this is an embarrassment to The US, we shouldn’t forget that the last election was us against THE WORLD. Obama was the global candidate. And there’s a growing albeit ludicrous sentiment on the international left that, because of our power and influence, it’s unfair that only US citizens have a voice – a vote even – in who the President is. So even though I’d like to see these leakerfuckers strung by their testicles and eaten alive by Grizzlies, there’s another part of me that sees this as a great big “fuck you” to the world for taking the side of a jug-eared left wing pussy. I’m all for him looking stupid in the eyes of the world if it makes them look stupid as well. Nobel Prize!!!

  6. I don’t know precisely when it was when we stopped treating treason as treason…

    When it was publicly committed by Henry Fonda’s daughter and applauded by the “elite”. Couldn’t very well execute a celebrity’s daughter for what the “elite” wished it could do, could we?

    And for some fun, compare the NYT’s breathless demands for prosecution of the “treason” of outing Plame with their total blackout on the actual treason of Code Pink (committed with the assistance of Pelosi, Waxman, and other Democrats). They were demanding the prosecution of Rove and Libby when they knew it was Armitage all along.

  7. Even the Rosenbergs were executed for mere “espionage.” their act was certainly treason, but the Constitution’s precisely laid-out requirements for prosecuting treason as such force most such acts to be treated as something else.

    Things being as they are in domestic politics I’m not sure that’s such a bad thing, but it would be nice if treasonous acts incurred some penalty.

  8. Oh, and I don’t think the US should quietly assassinate Assmange.

    I think it should be done as messily as possible, with as many of his enablers and funders and ass-kissers as possible caught in the blast. We should aim for a response that leaves future “leak publishers” wetting themselves with fear.

  9. McGehee — we don’t even exert ourselves over acts that fit the Constitutional definition to the letter, largely because no federal prosecutor wants his career ended by taking on the Democrat establishment.

  10. The United States isn’t alone in enmity toward Julian Assange, is it? Surely other nations whose leaders candid thoughts have been exposed — such as Saudi Arabia for instance — can’t be pleased to have this Assange fellow running about freely, poised to embarrass them again, whether through US leaks or leaks acquired elsewhere (as copycat leakers will no doubt be coming forward to strike a blow against the powers that be)? Should something untoward happen to Mr Assange there will be a long long long list of possible assailants with motive aplenty.

  11. One silver lining: the embarrassing things that Obama has said about other world leaders may serve to break the spell that the last hangers-on are under, especially in the Europress.

    So, there’s that.

  12. It’s always been the case that weak nations want the stronger nations to stop being so strong and so authoritative. The U.S. played that game too, when Brittania ruled the waves. I think it’s past time we cowboyed up a bit and starting taking ourselves seriously again as a superpower. That also means we need to protect our secrets from all enemies, foreign and domestic.

    Other nations will complain in public, but in private they will breathe a sigh of relief. The vast majority of western nations want a strong U.S., because it makes their lives a bit easier. Prosecuting these acts would be a good start.

  13. At Volokh.

    According to State Department legal advisor and former Yale Law School dean Harold Koh, the Wikileaks document dumps “place at risk the lives of countless innocent individuals [...] I’m glad Koh is sending Julian Assange of Wikileaks a stern letter of reprimand, that will show him! Who said the Obama Administration wasn’t tough enough to protect American interests?

  14. One silver lining: the embarrassing things that Obama has said about other world leaders may serve to break the spell that the last hangers-on are under, especially in the Europress.

    So, there’s that.

    I guess I’m just stunned that anyone actually really believed any of that bullshit to begin with.

    I was certain everyone knew it was all a show.

  15. The comments there (Volokh) are an exhibit of the schism that sdferr mentioned in #3.

  16. Other nations will complain in public, but in private they will breathe a sigh of relief. The vast majority of western nations want a strong U.S., because it makes their lives a bit easier.

    The current economic woes will look like a Golden Age if the US stops policing the seas — the cost of trade will skyrocket as every two-bit jihadi and Marxist decides to go into piracy.

  17. This administration (read: its masters) won’t authorize the elimination of these two tools because they are doing its bidding.

    Oh and to whomever stole my nick: bite me.

  18. Talk of treason and penalties for treason aside for a moment, if ever there was an Administration to publicly vet, this is the one.

    I’ll go a step further: Having no love for Bush’s globalist foreign policy and obvious connections such as the Sauds, light shed on the mess in the mideast and especially US involvement there isn’t all a bad thing. The words conflict of interest keeping coming to mind.

    Not least because such crap indirectly but eventually blurs the line about treason, making these improper revelations as much a commentary on years of bad politics operated outside the voter’s interest as they are on those who illegally break silence.

    When was treason mitigated? Probably roughly when we recognized the enemy was (among) us.

  19. I guess I’m just stunned that anyone actually really believed any of that bullshit to begin with.

    I was certain everyone knew it was all a show.

    The circumstantial evidence simply never lets up, does it?

    HOPE!

  20. Prof. Majid Shahriari, who died when his car was attacked in North Tehran Monday, Nov. 29, headed the team Iran established for combating the Stuxnet virus rampaging through its nuclear and military networks. His wife was injured. The scientist’s death deals a major blow to Iran’s herculean efforts to purge its nuclear and military control systems of the destructive worm since it went on the offensive six months ago.

    http://legalinsurrection.blogspot.com/2010/11/your-morning-too-good-not-to-be-true.html

  21. I was certain everyone knew it was all a show.

    Some people don’t care that it is, figuring that everything’s a show, so we might as well go with the show that puts us in power.

    And some people can’t tell the difference between a show and a traffic cam.

  22. geoffb, I half expect Mr Ledeen to get back to us in a couple of days with the information that these two scientists were suspected by the Iranian regime to have been cooperating with US intelligence agents, which then seized the main chance to kill four birds with one stone so to speak.

  23. I will hold my breath until demands for a frogmarching are issued.

    Not.

  24. So yes. Read between the lines. Because I am indeed saying it.

    Death threat – cool. I’m with you there, Jeff.

  25. Is it even physically possible to “frogmarch” Oliver Willis?

  26. “Some men aren’t looking for anything logical. They can’t be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.”

    Serial “arsonist” Julian Assange strikes again.

    (Euphemistically speaking, for all you legal beagles out there.)

  27. Pingback: WikiLeaks « Ric's Rulez

  28. ledeen

    Shortly before I went to work at the State Department, back in the last century, I asked Henry Kissinger for advice, and he had quite a bit of it. One terse statement has stayed with me: “the only reason to write a memo is to have it leaked.”

    He wasn’t the first to say that (I’m sure Talleyrand said something very similar), and I have no doubt that some of the “classified” cables were written specifically for that purpose. But even though some of the reported remarks of foreign leaders were undoubtedly given to Americans in order to deceive us or manipulate us, still and all I find the cables I’ve read so far to be very helpful to anyone trying to understand the world.

    It will no doubt annoy the Israel haters no end to discover that Arab leaders seem to be even more concerned about Iran than the crowd in Jerusalem, for example. And it’s very helpful for everyone to see that the “Axis of Evil” was real–the strategic cooperation on missiles and nukes between Iran and North Korea (with Chinese complicity) was intense.

    No surprise that the cables have been denounced as “mischief” by Ahmadinejad, since they document the fraudulent electoral “results” that gave him a second term, and present the ghastly details of Iran’s use of the Muslim version of the Red Cross for espionage and murder in Iraq. Indeed, if I wanted to invent evidence to document the case against Iran that I have been making for twenty years or more, I could not have done better than the State Department cables just released.

    Two thoughts:

    First, it would save the world a lot of time and trouble if most of this stuff were published, rather than classified.

    Second, the leakers should be punished violently. It has to be possible for our leaders to talk privately, both among themselves and with foreigners. If it’s all going to be leaked, candor will vanish and we will be locked into a wilderness of mirrors

    link

  29. Geoffb – it would take a medium sized Caterpillar and a forklift to frogmarch Oliver “the lord of lard” Willis.

  30. Hey, is that any way to speak of the world’s biggest blogger?

    Oh, wait…

  31. Crawford,

    And for some fun, compare the NYT’s breathless demands for prosecution of the “treason” of outing Plame with their total blackout on the actual treason of Code Pink (committed with the assistance of Pelosi, Waxman, and other Democrats). They were demanding the prosecution of Rove and Libby when they knew it was Armitage all along.

    Does anyone know if Richard Armitage is even mentioned in the new over-the-top Sean Penn melodrama, Fair Game?

  32. Does anyone know if Richard Armitage is even mentioned in the new over-the-top Sean Penn melodrama, Fair Game?

    Who knows? No one’s gone to see it.

  33. “It will no doubt annoy the Israel haters no end to discover that Arab leaders seem to be even more concerned about Iran than the crowd in Jerusalem, for example.”

    That’s actually been talked about publicly for years. The “Gulf states” as we know them were not-so-secretly rooting for both sides to lose during the Iran-Iraq war during the ’80s.

  34. Dunno about a mention, but here’s the full cast and crew and he ain’t in there in portrayal.

  35. I’m just envisioning how this will show up in campaign commercials and emails.

    On a more serious note – yes, this is espionage and treason, and should be dealt with as such. And if that happens, watch the MSM turn on Obama (at least on this one issue) because the MSM loves them some leaked documents. So it will be interesting to see if Obama has the balls to do what’s obviously the right thing and prosecute this. He’s a politician and politician = coward, so I’m not betting on it.

  36. Arab leaders seem to be even more concerned about Iran than the crowd in Jerusalem, for example.”

    It didn’t get nearly as much play as it should have, but Obama’s June 2009 meeting with Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah ended with the monarch flying into a tirade and more or less telling the President to get a grip. This was the Riyadh meeting that Obama took on his way to his insulting and failed Cairo Speech, the better to prepare himself by visiting “the place where Islam began.” The sit-down was such a disaster that Dennis Ross was hurriedly brought into the White House and given a broader role, yielding the impression that the President wanted a Middle East adviser who kind of understood something about the Middle East – and didn’t think he had one.

    [...]

    the King kind of thought he was dealing with a serious person who could separate spectacle from policy. Instead he got the equivalent of an International Relations graduate student enamored with pseudo-sophisticated “insights” he’d gleaned from Arab media outlets. Ergo, meltdown.

  37. Darn only the first word was to be orange.

  38. Jen Rubin at Contentions (can’t get the url to post, so’s ya gotta finds it yerself):

    . . . there is zero evidence that the Palestinian non-peace talks were essential to obtaining the assistance of the Arab states on Iran. To the contrary, what emerges is precisely the portrait that knowledgeable critics of the administration had already painted: Obama has taken his eye off the real ball, placed friendly Arab states in a precarious situation, and misrepresented to the American people and the world that the non-peace talks are necessary to curb the Iranian threat. To the contrary, those talks have been a grand waste of time and a dangerous distraction. Obama frittered away two years that could have been spent cementing an Israeli-Arab alliance against Tehran. Why? Perhaps he is blinded by ideology. Perhaps he realized it was his only chance for a diplomatic win. But whatever the explanation, we should be clear: linkage was a tale told to justify the president’s obsession with a Palestinian-Israeli peace deal.

    “Why?” she asks?

    *Ali Abunimeh*

    Gesundheit.

  39. Got to love the Arabs – tell us through back channel “please, please, please, take out Iran!!!” while preparing to publicly denounce us and organize street protests if we do. Who says you can’t have your cake and eat it to? The one silver lining in the leaks is the light it shines on all those snakes – Iran included.

  40. You sound so provincial, Alex. Arab doublespeak is hardly a new phenomenon, nor is the relish with which they play useful lefties who are wedded to emotion-based narratives.

  41. It’s almost as though you’ve worked yourself into a position where you can’t distinguish one thing from another for lumping all members of whatever class (politicians as in politician = coward, the Arabs by which I take you to mean weak Arab states) together as indistinguishable isn’t it Alex? It’s an imposition of dumb, if you ask me.

  42. Dear, dear ignorant Alex, so typical.

    Is the minefield Arab leaders have to tapdance through in their relationship with the religious authorities and their hold on the populace really new information for you?

    Regards,
    Ric

  43. Good news, everyone!

    Glenn Beck has found multiple financial ties between WikiLeaks, Assange, and the military dood what supplied the material.

    Let’s knock everyone over with a feather!

    Glenn also points out that so far, none of the things leaked are all that surprising, but they DO verify that the gubmint has been lying to us.

    And the leaks also produce an outcry from all corners, saying “Can’t you stop these people?” Which could be a manufactured crisis to give the Oministration an excuse to clamp down on the Internet.

    Not on Assange and his collaborators, but on the INTERNET.

    You don’t put it past them either.

  44. Powerline pimpslaps the NYT with this pull quote:

    “The documents appear to have been acquired illegally and contain all manner of private information and statements that were never intended for the public eye, so they won’t be posted here.”

    Treasonous hypocritical bastards.

  45. Far be it from me to defend alex_, but it seems to me you’re less likely to go wrong by assuming any random politician is a coward than you are to go broke underestimating the intelligence of a community organizer with a Harvard law degree.

  46. From the AP article on the leaks:

    The leaks disclosed bluntly candid impressions from both diplomats and other world leaders about America’s allies and foes.

    It was, said Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini, the “Sept. 11 of world diplomacy.”

    There you have it: Assange = Bin Laden. Italy’s Foreign Minister said so.

    I expect to see the Predators spinning up shortly.

  47. Related:

    Julian Assange snubbed both the New York Times (which got its share of the leaked documents from The Guardian) and Washington Post this time around, but did offer its ill-gotten cables to the Wall Street Journal. But the Journal declined.*

  48. Related, the second:

    It seems more than passingly strange that this administration has taken stronger action against copyright infringement than in protecting the secrets of the US and its allies.*

  49. First and foremost, what steps were taken to stop Wikileaks director Julian Assange from distributing this highly sensitive classified material especially after he had already published material not once but twice in the previous months? Assange is not a “journalist,” any more than the “editor” of al Qaeda’s new English-language magazine Inspire is a “journalist.” He is an anti-American operative with blood on his hands. His past posting of classified documents revealed the identity of more than 100 Afghan sources to the Taliban. Why was he not pursued with the same urgency we pursue al Qaeda and Taliban leaders?

    What if any diplomatic pressure was brought to bear on NATO, EU, and other allies to disrupt Wikileaks’ technical infrastructure? Did we use all the cyber tools at our disposal to permanently dismantle Wikileaks? Were individuals working for Wikileaks on these document leaks investigated? Shouldn’t they at least have had their financial assets frozen just as we do to individuals who provide material support for terrorist organizations?

    Most importantly, serious questions must also be asked of the U.S. intelligence system. How was it possible that a 22-year-old Private First Class could get unrestricted access to so much highly sensitive information? And how was it possible that he could copy and distribute these files without anyone noticing that security was compromised?

    link

  50. Most importantly, serious questions must also be asked of the U.S. intelligence system. How was it possible that a 22-year-old Private First Class could get unrestricted access to so much highly sensitive information? And how was it possible that he could copy and distribute these files without anyone noticing that security was compromised?

    Bingo. If a some deviant Australian can get his hands on this, imagine what the Chinese have been able to read.

  51. A lot of great comment here.

    Let me be the inept white Washington General here amongst the Globetrotters.

    I make my living, for the most part, getting what I should not get and am not otherwise permitted to see, from all manner of people and institutions. Such is the life of a reporter. I can’t argue with what Ledeen wrote, not at all, but people like me getting things I/we shouldnt ultimately serves important ends. Maybe a better way of saying this is the best way to keep the bastards with power checked is sunlight, usually something has to be pried open from their cold, cruel hands via reporting.

    I do it with numbers on my website going after scammy companies, others do it with FOIA, or being well-sourced.

    But I wont kid myself. This stuff hurts the American enterprise and that’s bad.

  52. Good on ya, Roddy. You might be one of the only journalist types that I have ever seen admit that. I was about to unload on you for your offhand comment that the Times (I am paraphrasing) was being careful with what they disclosed, but then you go and get kind of reasonable.

  53. Hey,
    Let’s give Alex a shot. He appears reasonable enough, if not fully congruent with the mainstream around here.
    Certainly he caught me being sloppy the other day and wasn’t an ass about it.

    My two cents.

  54. Speaking of, where has mcgruder been? He is another honest journalist. So is Bradley Fikes. A distinct minority to be sure, but they do exist.

  55. Roddy=mcgruder, JD.

  56. This stuff hurts the American enterprise and that’s bad.

    alot of it blows holes in the proggs world view

  57. Speaking of which, clever headline on the latest Harbin Electric piece, Roddy.

    Hey, you’ve been known to own some stock from time to time, JD, you might enjoy his blog.

  58. like

    As has already been noted this morning on CONTENTIONS, this corresponds with what we’ve learned from other Arab leaders. For example, Bahrain’s king warning that the “danger of letting it [Iran’s nuclear program] go on is greater than the danger of stopping it.” King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia urged the United States to attack Iran to destroy its nuclear program. The Saudi king “frequently exhorted the US to attack Iran to put an end to its nuclear weapons program,” one cable stated. “He told you [Americans] to cut off the head of the snake,” the Saudi ambassador to Washington, Adel al-Jubeir said, according to a report on Abdullah’s meeting with the General David Petraeus in April 2008. Crown Prince bin Zayed of Abu Dhabi, in warning of the dangers of appeasing Iran, declared, “Ahmadinejad is Hitler.”

  59. Thanks JD and BH.
    All those years at the NY Post pay off….

  60. Oh yeah, you’ve probably already heard about this, Roddy, but you might be interested in the Forbes interview.

    These megaleaks, as you call them that, we haven’t seen any of those from the private sector.

    No, not at the same scale for the military.

    Will we?

    Yes. We have one related to a bank coming up, that’s a megaleak. It’s not as big a scale as the Iraq material, but it’s either tens or hundreds of thousands of documents depending on how you define it.

    Is it a U.S. bank?

    Yes, it’s a U.S. bank.

    One that still exists?

    Yes, a big U.S. bank.

    The biggest U.S. bank?

    No comment.

    When will it happen?

    Early next year. I won’t say more.

  61. BoA?

    How did I miss that mcgruder and Roddy were the same? I am dummerer than a bag of Yelvertons sometimes.

    I bookmarked that blog, bh. I dabble. The way I figure, by the time the info is out there, it is too late to catch the big wave, no?

  62. I just skimmed the Harbin articles, and that is some seriously good stuff, mcgruder.

  63. No idea, JD. My first thought was Wachovia (bought by Wells Fargo) but that’s almost a pure guess.

  64. It has to be BoA. Nobody else is more in bed with the government.

  65. BH–you know I had been wondering that same thing just last night. Its either going to be very good or utterly pointless, 911,000 pages of synopsis on soul-crushing initiative roll-outs….or it will be BoA talking about how they are dumber than a bag of Yelverton’s talking about taking over Countrywide and Merrill…..

    something like that.

    JD-ha. thanks

  66. guessing BAC myself.
    Basket case situation.

    C, Citi, would be the obvious second guess

  67. I’m just hoping Assange and friends can’t resist the temptation to short them.

  68. I’m just hoping Assange and friends can’t resist the temptation to short them.

    that’s soros’ job

  69. What is the big deal? This stuff is minor-league; maybe even a government feed. Why not see these foreign assholes revealed as the morons that they are? Well played, America.

  70. From that Assange Forbes interview bh links above

    What do you think of the idea of WikiLeaks copycats and spinoffs?

    There have been a few over time, and they’ve been very dangerous. It’s not something that’s easy to do right. That’s the problem. Recently we saw a Chinese WikiLeaks. We encouraged them to come to us to work with us. It would be nice to have more Chinese speakers working with us in a dedicated way. But what they’d set up had no meaningful security.

    Security for me, not for thee. Why shouldn’t Wikileaks be thoroughly transparent? That’s what they’re shooting for externally, why not internally?

  71. So you’re a Bradley Manning fan then, cynn?

  72. Who would that be?

  73. Bradley Manning is probably not the brother of Peyton Manning, and he was arrested for some crime or other. I don’t think there’s a crime here; information is free.

  74. What is the big deal?

    asshats who undermine amerikkka suck

  75. No, asshats who subsist on amerikkka fear suck.

  76. Any word on that TrollHammer rewrite?

  77. I take it I should be trollhammered. Sounds like a Nordic thing.

  78. hi cynn how are you I hope you had a nice thanksgiving

    I made tasty sammins from a recipe I got from Mr. daleyrocks. And I watched about Mr. Scott Pilgrim and his travails what he had.

  79. So this Roddy guy says it’s cruel to be kind. In the right measure.

  80. Bradley Manning is probably not the brother of Peyton Manning, and he was arrested for some crime or other.

    Bradley Manning is currently looking at 52 years, and I don’t suppose we’re quite done with him yet. Despite my lack of love for Peyton, he puts his team on his back and does his best to win. Bradley just wanted to fuck it in the ass.

    So this Roddy guy says it’s cruel to be kind. In the right measure.

    It’s a very good sign.

  81. 52 years is many

  82. Indeed it is. Some folks are arguing that he shouldn’t get 52 years. Their reasons vary.

  83. Hard to say, 52 is either very long compared to muzzle velocity/ target distance or very short compared to being dead forever and ever, amen.

  84. (Muzzle velocity divided by target distance, the slash might have been confusing.)

  85. You see what I’m saying, yes?

  86. Oh, I see what you’re saying, Pablo. In fact, you beat me to the point, which I find to be a terrible habit that you share with your quick fingers.

    My comment was towards the idea of 52 years being long rather than towards your similar snark.

  87. I can’t get too upset about it really there’s lots of people what have fucked our little country in the ass way more viciously than little Bradley for example the president bumblefuck and the Nancy Pelosi

  88. Yeah, I’m saying it too, bh. We are several.

  89. I wonder what Bumblefuck and Pelosi think about the whole thing. Holder is making some appropriate noises, for what that’s worth.

  90. Obama and Pelosi don’t have to do it that way. They were duly elected.

    Which, yeah, that’s mind-numbingly worse.

  91. 9 mm to the head is fast

  92. our president is a whore

  93. that’s not a good feeling

  94. “Treason doth never prosper: what’s the reason?
    Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.”
    – Sir John Harrington

  95. Mike, you keep rising on the list of someone I’d like to take a course from.

  96. What the heck are you people so hysterical about? Oh. My. God.

  97. To be unfortunately serious, instead of answering your question ironically, cynn, I’d ask you why you seek this form of attention.

    You could just join the conversation straight up without the constant mindless provocation. Why not give it a try?

  98. With all respect, I think you’re the attention-seeker. So answer the question.

  99. here is the song about the giving away the secrets

  100. Mike, you keep rising on the list of someone I’d like to take a course from.

    Thanks, bh. Coming from one of the best commenters at pw, that is indeed high praise.

  101. Cynn,
    I love Nick Lowe (and Dave Edmunds.)
    They don’t love each other, but that is a different story.

    Me, I’m tallking my book–literally–and my beliefs.

    Discount it to hell and back or not.

    I think the sun rises in the east tommorow.

    FWIW, the big news in all this is that the Arabs are PRAYING either we–the Great Satan–or the Israelis hit Iran.

    Of course, all this negates the true news: Wille Nelson, busted for reefer.
    The republic hangs in the balance.
    Jeff, Darleen, Im talking to you guys….

  102. I got your back on that sun thing

  103. There is no hysteria here, cynn. Think of it as more like an old Italian grandmother casually snapping a bunny’s neck before skinning it for dinner. It’s the reality of the situation. Traitors should die. Then maybe put in a pot and boiled for to make soup.

  104. Haven’t I seen you as a legitimate economic advisor on another website, Abe? A commenter, maybe? It was a surprise, to say the least.

  105. You think because I have a phony Jewish internet name that I’m all about money, cynn? You miserable anti-fakesemite.

  106. You are right, I’m pretty damn awesome, Mike. I think we can all agree on that.

    (You all better be nodding along in agreement.)

    Cynn, why you gotta be this way?

  107. Yep, you are, bh! And so is Abe Froman, whom Cynn doesn’t seem to realize is the Sausage King of Chicago.

  108. the truth is nobody knows where Jack Bauer is

    nobody here anyway

  109. I’m pretty damn awesome, Mike.

    And I get 15% of awesome which makes me the C- guy in the back row throwing spitballs at the front row. Thwaaap….

  110. Ah, Jack Bauer’s gone Hollywood.

  111. The article geoffb linked up there under “More Bumblefucking” reveals perhaps the most profoundly interlocking set of stupidities in the history of the conduct of US foreign policy. It’s so dumb it gets to be extremely difficult to account for the intentionalites at work in the decision making process. Indeed, it’s difficult to imagine any serious decision making process at work at all.

  112. #99
    National security? You know. One of those icky constitutional things that the government is obligated to do.

    Now crawl back in your box.

  113. Couple of things.

    sdferr,

    To me it appears as if our “Ship of State” is now being crewed by clones of the character “Zap” at the beginning of “La Femme Nikita”. Their only goal is to “Zap-it”.

    Also another side event that event be occurring with the Wikileaks is for other parties to throw out their own mis/dis-information into the vast expanse of the Wikileaks papers as being from the original source.

  114. Also another side event that appears to be occurring…

    I keep forgetting that we have preview now.

  115. With any luck Cynn has finished her googling, and is now at Netflix ordering up a copy of Ferris Beuller’s Day Off.

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