August 21, 2007

The Framing of the Shrew

Amanda Marcotte is still blogging? Even after being exposed as an embarrassing opportunist and a purveyor of gross libels against those wrongly accused of rape (and their defenders)?

Wow, who knew? And about my cock again, no less…

Not that she can help herself, the poor dear. Much as she tries, she just can’t seem to quit the hypermasculinist bad boys.

— Which, on the plus side, there’s yet another nail in the coffin of Neiwert’s insipid theory of masculinity.

While I’m on the subject of St Amanda of the Perpetual Yeast Infection, though, I’ll offer the following observation: I’ve been reading Tom Robbins’ Fierce Invalids Home from Hot Climates (which would no doubt come as a surprise to Pat Schroeder — but then, she’s something of a bigoted moron), and just the other night I came across the following passage, in which the protagonist, Switters, engages in a theological discussion with Domino Thiry, a nun from an exotic (enclosed) convent whose order has run afoul of the Church proper by taking “public issue with the Holy See’s inflexible stand against birth control”:

     “Naturally,” said Switters. “Isn’t it the sacred duty of the Catholic masses to increase geometrically the number of true believers in the world, just as it’s a secular duty to provide merchandisers with more and more little consumers?
     “[The Order of] Pachomians don’t look for ulterior motives. That’s too cynical. We petition for free will and common sense and compassion, and avoid casting blame on the guardians of the doctrine. After all, they were divinely commanded to ‘go forth, be fruitful, and mulitiply’.”
     “You mean their tribal antecedents were so commanded. Four thousand years ago. Before a person had to stand in line for an hour and a half just to get a whiff of fresh air. It’s tough to say who’s a greater threat to the world, an ambitious CEO with a big ad budget or a crafty cleric with an obolete Bible verse.”

Robbins’ novel was published in 2000. Whereas it wasn’t until December 2006 that Marcotte posted her now infamous bit about the evil Catholic patriarchy, and its desire to control women and increase the profitability of the herd:

[…] the Catholic church is not about to let something like compassion for girls [here, allowing teens access to emergency contraception] get in the way of using the state as an instrument to force women to bear more tithing Catholics.

Interesting similarities, I’d say.

Which isn’t to suggest that Marcotte stole the idea from Robbins — I have no idea if she’s ever read the book, and even if she had, it’s possible she simply internalized the passage, or that the criticism itself is practically doctrinaire — but I do find it funny that, for all her posturing as the blogosphere’s edgiest feminist provocateur, she’s really nothing more than an ideological sellout who got canned from her gig on the Edwards campaign for an anti-Catholic line that wasn’t even terribly original to begin with.

Seriously. It makes me smile and smile.

Posted by Jeff G. @ 3:44pm
111 comments | Trackback

Comments (111)

  1. Pingback: Manly Unmanly Men Acting Unmanly to Prove Manliness

  2. Does she just do this so that she can get attention. That seems to be the leftie “go to”…when you want hits…slander Jeff G. Well you know what…you’re an asshole, now people will visit my site and while I might be verbally punished, at least I get hits. Keep that counter ticking!

  3. The title ought to be “Deeper Amanda Marcotte.” I love this comment, though:

    I don’t molest children, I’m not a racist, and I donate to charity. but that isn’t what MAKES me good. I’m good because I’m a good person.
    I’m secure in my sexuality, not unpleasant to be around, and have a rather charming beard if I do say so myself, but that isn’t the source of masculinity. Nor is it threatening people, or following through on threats, being violent, joining a gun club or posing for the cover of a hack fantasy novel I’ve written with a flaming sword. If you can imagine ANYONE childish, immature, effeminine, or anything else that you’d qualify as being not-masculine doing any activity, then no matter how many of those activities you stack up, it doesn’t make you masculine.

    This isn’t World of Warcraft. Things like good and evil, fame or anonymity, masculine or feminine are intangebles. there’s NOTHING that can be done to make any of them manifest. they simply are or aren’t.

    The Interpretation of Pure Ontology.

  4. Also . . . have you ever tried writing with a flaming sword?

  5. Flaming?

    No. But we are willing to try.

  6. Hey, has Mandy ever apologized for her vicious attacks on the three innocent young men at Duke?

  7. Do not make me side with the likes of Marcotte. It’s not plagiarism. It’s just that close to doctrine. Catholics that preach about making more Catholics and more tithers.
    But they are paper tithers, asking for cheeseburgers.

  8. Well, my belief is that at a certain point in the near future Jeff and Amanda will achieve a kabuki-level of concision to their exchanges.

    btw, along these lines, among GQ’s 50 Most powerful people in DC is Andrew Sullivan, who is manliness made manifest made insufferablly excitable, and not George W. Bush, who presumably likes to relax by sipping Lemon Zinger while wearing slippers and a nice housecoat after a long day at the office.

    Condoleeza Rice is #1 – which further proves Niewart’s point, as such.

  9. I try not to think of Marcotte, Bumperstickerist. It was pure serendipity that she decided to link here today with the latest in her attempts to out cock me.

  10. Liberals really do read more than conservatives. Or sure as hell consistently say they do. What’s up with that? Does it reflect incuriousness on the part of conservatives or a publishing industry tilted toward liberal reading tastes? Or something else?

  11. I suspect that most of those in Oprah’s book club aren’t your Bill Buckley types, happyfeet.

  12. btw, along these lines, among GQ’s 50 Most powerful people in DC is Andrew Sullivan

    BECAUSE OF THE POWER GLUTES! And teh crazee.

  13. I think that Monty Python song/thing about sacred sperm significantly pre-dated 2000.

    Also, the nun speaking of overpopulation reminds me of the opening quote from a book I’m reading just now.

    “On the whole, we’re a murderous race.”
    “According to Genesis, it took as few as four people to make the planet too crowded to stand, and the first murder was a fratricide. Genesis says that in a fit of jealous rage, the very first child born to mortal parents, Cain, snapped and popped the first metaphorical cap in an other human being. The attack was a bloody, brutal, violent, reprehensible killing. Cain’s brother Abel probably never saw it coming.”

    I don’t care that Jim Butcher doesn’t write literature. With that first observation he’s earned a permanent place in my book as someone with exceptional insight. (He also writes manly books with a manly protagonist doing manly things, plus he’s got a manly name, so there!)

  14. Comment by SarahW on 8/21 @ 4:17 pm #

    People who make puns should be hung, drawn and quoted.

  15. the first murder was a fratricide

    Well, there weren’t many options, y’know.

  16. Eh, regarding the Robbins book, I’ve read most of those and to be honest, the main ideas are about as shallow as a puddle in the AZ sun. Don’t get me wrong, he’s a hell of a write from an entertainment standpoint, but philosophically, he’s about as one-dimensional as it gets. I think I can sum up pretty much every book’s main philosophical premises: pre-judeo-christian fertility cult = good, oriental philosophy = OK, anything occidental or emblematic of wetsern society = bad, as in corrupt, worn-out, trite and tired, and possibly with a bit of genuine evil.

  17. Heh. Hung.

  18. Yes, Dan. But does his vibrator got to eleven? Amandas does. Or it better if it knows whats good for it.

  19. I’d bet family size plays into it. Just for curiosity at the weekend or the weekend after maybe I’ll see what the numbers say about what corresponds with heavy reading. If it’s interesting I will post some bullet points in the pub. It’s not that it’s so very significant, it’s just that there has to be a why there, and I’m not sure what that is. In my experience, “prodigious” readers aren’t necessarily tackling the heavy lifting, so I have no idea what kind of conclusions you can draw… Anyway, I have to do one of these analysis thingers anyway, and that’s as good a topic as any.

  20. “Comment by happyfeet on 8/21 @ 4:33 pm #

    Liberals really do read more than conservatives. Or sure as hell consistently say they do. What’s up with that? Does it reflect incuriousness on the part of conservatives or a publishing industry tilted toward liberal reading tastes? Or something else?”

    Well, I for one, sure as hell wouldn’t want to try to move my library.

    And speaking of manly men, I am currently reading

    “Wellington: The Years fo the Sword” by Elizabeth Longford.

    Hmmm….

    Written by a woman……But read by a man……

  21. N. O’B–
    A manly man wouldn’t quail at the thought of moving his library. He’d just do it.

  22. Glenn Greenwald’s “Twenty Years Before the Mast.”

  23. Strike the extra “that”.

    All this womanly manliness recursion has disoriented me.

    Reminds me of the time Allah, way back when. posted those campaign “manly-like-a-Kennedy” pics of Kerry and Edwards tossing the pigskin back and forth. I remember being surprised, confused, and a little disappointed that that Edwards looked more masculine with jazz hands than the football.

  24. Mr. Brain, it’s really a true thing, at least that is what marketing research consistently suggests. Pat Schroeder is being really oddly smug about that, since as the head of the whatever dork organization she’s head of, she should know that growing the industry doesn’t mean to focus on the “prodigious readers” (not a marketing friendly phrase, that), she should be more concerned with how to get the less prodigious people reading more.

  25. Teh Prodigal Reader.

  26. I thought that the prodigious readers were all reading several Harlequins a day.

  27. Glenn Reynolds is a prodigious reader. I don’t know how much he retains though.

  28. Midol really works.

  29. If anyone has a link to liberals reading more I’d love to see it and see what they are reading and if they just asked people or what.

  30. Glenn Greenwald’s “Twenty Years Before the Mast.”

    Dan:

    I had my students read Dana’s Two Years Before the Mast.

    I have never been so close to mutiny!

  31. Yeah, but Dana’s book is all about man vs. nature, whereas . . .
    I forgot where I was going with that.

  32. My students’ perception was that Dana’s book was actually all about strange names for knots and sails. They hated it more than they did Moby Dick–and that’s saying a whale of a lot.

  33. I don’t have a link, but it’s for real. I guess AP-Ipsos did their own thing – they should have that up somewhere, I can check laters. But I bet they didn’t ask *what* they were reading except broadly “books,” fiction, non-fiction. Amazon has that data more than anyone I’d guess.

  34. “Liberals really do read more than conservatives.”

    U-betcha. The also use up the 64 color packs at eight times the rate of conservatives. Crayola’s marketing division knows all about it.

  35. Moby Dick Durbin Before He Dicks You

  36. It’s just a behavioral data point. There are a lot of them. When you cut the data by political outlook, there are differences in a lot of the data points. Some of them are like ha ha you stupid liberal. Some of them go the other way. It’s good cause that way people can make products and services that appeal to you.

  37. There are reports that Glenn Reynolds moves his lips while he reads … just sayin’ – you know, if you can read lips and happen to be sitting across from Glenn, you could save a bundle.

  38. The tendency of leftards to lack reading comprehensive skills has been much discussed around here, but note how many of Marcottes readers are more in agreement with Jeff as far as what they actually say. I don’t think sny of them have a clue what Neiwart or JG are actually saying.

  39. As Jeffrey Ross said of Sandra Bernhardt, “I wouldn’t fuck her with Bea Arthur’s dick.”

  40. Well, shewt, it’s not just a matter of creating a lot of new little tithers (see, the more congregants you have, the more churches you have to build, so it doesn’t exactly work to your advantage), it’s also a matter of whose population will out-reproduce the other.

    Them as aborts their offspring or prevents its conception will die out faster than them as takes as many as they can get. Ask Mark Steyn.

  41. We are graced, GRACED I tell you, with the prsence of the great iowahawk.

  42. happyfeet, I wonder whether the gap narrows if you consider liberals with families vs. conservatives with families and liberals without families vs. conservatives without families. I suspect that it does, though I’m not willing to speculate on how much.

  43. Also, the presence……

    [Jeff, bring back preview. Preview is my friemd.]

  44. We are graced, GRACED I tell you, with the prsence of the great iowahawk.

    If it’s ten prsence, then he’s a tither too.

    (Sorry, N.O. — but if you hadn’t called attention to it I wouldn’t have seen it.)

  45. “Liberals really do read more than conservatives.”

    But they all read THE SAME DAMN THING. These are people who are desperately afraid of being seen with the wrong book on the coffee table or in the student cafeteria.

    Conservatives, on the other hand, are liable to send a copy of South Park Conservatives to Pat Robertson…

  46. I will definitely check SJ – it’s time-consuming but I have to do a demonstration of multivariate analysis soon so weekend after next I have to put something together anyway. If I can get the data to say anything I will do a post here in the pub with the observations. It would be unsourced and all, but my word is as good as the AP’s. I like to think.

  47. Steven Jens,

    It would be easier to just ask “Do you think Michael Oakshott’s rebuttal of Auguste Comte is actually sufficient?” Just mark down the number of “Who?” answers and compare and contrast. (Blank looks count as “Who?”.)

  48. also it’s time-consuming cause I suck at it

  49. N.O. Brain – I have that book and read it a couple of times. It is a good read and a good study in command, starting with command over the self, and a study of a man who keeps an open mind. The Indian general was willing to use anything and not reject something out of hand; the peninsular general adapted to the reality of Iberia.

    A very good read.

  50. Steve Jens (I remember you from CYTAG!)–
    liberals with families vs. conservatives with families and liberals without families vs. conservatives without families.

    I’d break it down further, by occupation. Professors, librarians, journalists, and other professions that require reading books trend liberal.

  51. Cowboy: You might find “Man O War Life” by Charles Nordhoff (Naval Institute Press) very interesting. The pre-Civil War navy, and the round the world voyage of USS Columbus. As it is said, the more things change, the more things remain the same.

  52. “It’s tough to say who’s a greater threat to the world, an ambitious CEO with a big ad budget or a crafty cleric with an obolete Bible verse.”
    To answer Tim Robbin’s question in a manner that he’s not likely to like let me quote C.S. Lewis: “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.”

    Ps: I know it’s easy to say “ah, moral busybodies, that means the religious right” but I’m pretty sure includes the realtive morality of the self appointed “omnipotent progressives” and the group think they extol.

  53. If you count People, US Weekly, and Details as reading, then I am certain that the Left reads more, considerably more.

    Currently, I am reading The Alchemist for about the 20th time, but I seem to get something different out of it every time.

  54. CS Lewis was one wise motherfucker.

  55. Jeff, when are you going to break down and give Mandy the cuffs, ball gag and cock-slapping she obviously craves?

  56. Heather makes a good point. But also there are all sorts of correlation hypotheses you can explore by postulating transitivity, like, we know conservatives are more charitable than liberals, we know conservatives read less than liberals. Does reading cause uncharitability?

  57. “Does reading cause uncharitability?”

    Perhaps not but conservatism certainly heightens awareness that new/=good. “Been there, done that” may account for a certain amount of the difference. I don’t really have to think much about whether I would rather read C. S. Lewis or Michael Oakshott for the fifth time or “YOUR CHOICE OF “NEW!!” for the first.

    It’s similiar to watching George Carlin do Lenny Bruce, I suppose. You wind up thinking “I think I know where he stole that one”, time after time after time – until Robin Williams steals Carlin’s riff and then…..

    It almost makes ya wonder if the writer of Ecclesiastes didn’t get it about right 3,000 years ago.

  58. See also some thoughts at NRO.

    Good luck, happyfeet.

    HeatherRadish: Can’t think that I remember anyone at CY-TAG named Radish, but my memory fades. Education as an explanatory variable did occur to me – liberals have more PhDs. There are also more liberal high-school drop-outs than conservative high-school drop-outs, but I wouldn’t be surprised if book-reading as a function of education really takes off with a graduate degree. If the figures we’re looking at are medians, they shouldn’t get pulled up by this too much, but it might be a factor. Hopefully happyfeet will tell us in a couple of weeks.

  59. I don’t care that Jim Butcher doesn’t write literature.

    Pfeh. What gets classified as “literature” is either old popular writing (Shakespeare, Twain, Melville) or current, un-popular writing.

    And for what it’s worth, I’d much rather read someone like Butcher (or Heinlein, or Drake, or Joel (no C) Rosenberg) than most of what’s considered “deep”. They’re not just entertaining — they understand humanity well enough to teach about it. When I read Xenophon’s Anabasis, it was familiar not just because it served as inspiration for some SF writers, but because the people in the story had the same motivations, the same needs and wants, as the people of today and the people in those other stories.

  60. I like Regina Spektor.

    There. I said it.

  61. Most of the stuff they make you plow through in grad school lit crit programs is pure, unadulterated krep, and poorly written krep at that. It’s boring, long-winded, no plot to speak of, no characterization beyond variations on nihilistic ennui.

    No one, and I mean NO ONE, not even grad school students, reads that stuff unless they are forced to, and sometimes not even then. But it’s significant, you see, so you should take it like medicine. And once you’ve read it, you are made Morally Superior to those idiot inbred rednecks who watch NASCAR.

    It’s magic!

  62. dicentra – Those who mock NASCAR fans have never been to a race in person. Just sayin’ …

  63. “Flaming?

    No. But we are willing to try.”

    Do they send you to a special school or something?

  64. Masculine is as mescaline does. This whole silly debate is a tampax in a teapot.

  65. Now that’s funny, cynn. Bravo.

  66. Teapot? As in “I’m a little teapot”?

    Misandry.

  67. Hmmm…looks like Mandy has gotten tired of pegging punkass marc.

  68. I’m a little teapot, short and stout.

    Watch it, cynn. You are getting dangerously close to fat midget territory.

  69. But are you absorbing the import?

  70. Your cock could not have found a more delightful frame!! But I am puzzled by the contextualisation of your cock as shrewish.

  71. Comment by JD on 8/21 @ 7:43 pm #

    dicentra – Those who mock NASCAR fans have never been to a race in person. Just sayin’ …

    Those who mock Nascar fans have never been to a race in prison. The three-legged potato sack races always end in violence.

  72. Ummm.. what the HELL is an ‘emergency contraceptive’?

  73. People like Mandy the Mental Midget are the same folks who shrieked when Cardinal Ratzinger was elected as pope. How DARE those filthy Catholics follow Catholic doctrine! The haters!

    Whatever. I read the Left only so I know what I need to fight against. I certainly don’t go looking for any kind of real insight from them.

  74. I enjoyed this zinger in response to Schroeders drivel about how conservative ideas are so simplistic that they render reading unnecessary:

    White House spokesman Tony Fratto said Schroeder was “confusing volume with quality” with her remarks.

    “Obfuscation usually requires a lot more words than if you simply focus on fundamental principles, so I’m not at all surprised by the loquaciousness of liberals,” he said.

  75. They trade in character assassination and self-righteousness.

    In another age, they’d be shunned. Today, they root each other on like a band of mischievous gibbons.

  76. “While I’m on the subject of St Amanda of the Perpetual Yeast Infection”

    It’s really awesome when you get your feminist on.

  77. Pingback: The Stout Republican » Blog Archive » Early AM Quote

  78. I’m sorry, markel. Have I violated a feminist speech code?

    If it makes you feel better, I’m cool with any women using the term “Yeast Infection,” too.

    Equality, you see.

  79. Here’s a nice little quote from their comments:

    “It’s part of an oppressive dualistic hierarchy and, with femininity, is best left to the dustbin of history”

    And then we become, what, robots?

  80. How could somebody go an entire year and not read a book ?

  81. “I’m sorry, markel. Have I violated a feminist speech code?”

    Not at all. In fact I think you’re you’re getting your feminist on just perfect. The equity of yeast infections is before us in full splendor.

  82. How could somebody go an entire year and not read a book ?

    nothin’ but blogs and magazines, baby!

  83. Ummm.. what the HELL is an ‘emergency contraceptive’?

    Morning after pill.

  84. I prefer the pull out method. Thus far, it’s been 100% effective.

    Quick question… I’m wondering how people like Marcotte reconcile the belief that the Church’s stance against contraception is out of a desire to “force women to bear more tithing Catholics”, with the Church’s stance on premarital sex, combined with the fact that, if one actually followed one of the two prescriptions presented for preventing unwanted pregnancy, the Church’s is 100% effective, while contraception… not so much.

    Seems like a rather perfect example of a non-sequitur. Or maybe I’m being too obtuse?

  85. Agent W

    Quit confusing The Narrative™ with facts. You’ll harsh the mellow of Teh Feminist Hive Mind.©

    BECAUSE OF THE CHRISTOFASCIST GODBOTHERERS!

  86. I was raised Catholic and have never heard that tithing is a requirement of the faith. Charity, yes, including financial contributions to good causes, but no particular percentage is recommended. I just checked the latest (1997) Catechism, which is on-line with a search function here, and the only mention of ‘tithe’ or ‘tithing’ is in a list of Old Testament charitable ordinances, some of which (prohibition of lending at interest) I’m pretty sure are not binding on Catholics. It looks to me as if Marcotte’s attribution of ‘tithing’ to Catholics is yet another example of pure ignorance.

  87. I should probably clarify: I’m not saying that Christians don’t tithe, I’m saying that Christians who tithe are generally Protestants, not Catholics. (Don’t know about the Orthodox.) As I wrote five years ago, it appears that Bush tithes so discreetly that no one outside a few bloggers ever noticed.

  88. Coincidentally, Marcotte will in fact be struck dead if she ever touches a man’s penis.

  89. Beck – Who would put their penis through such torture ?

  90. JD – People are into all kinds of freaky shit.

  91. Technically, there is no good reason not to tithe. It’s one of those things were the answer comes down to “Eh… yeah, but that’s really hard, and most people won’t do it anyway, so we’re not even going to try to tell ‘em to.” Kinda’ like meat on Fridays, or abstaining one hour before mass.

    I’m born, raised, Baptized, and Confirmed Roman Catholic. I tithed from the time I got a job until very recently (which is one of many manifestations of my present abscence of faith).

  92. phrasing the morning-after-pill as an ‘emergency contraceptive’ seems like an oxymoron. Unless one has continued non-consensual intercourse, the thought of an emergency contraceptive is like making emergency right-turn from the left lane. Just sorta admits that planning and responsibility ain’t one’s strong suit. Nor is taking responsibility for one’s actions, when you flee the scene after clipping two fenders and a bumper in your reckless driving wake.

  93. “Just sorta admits that planning and responsibility ain’t one’s strong suit. Nor is taking responsibility for one’s actions, when you flee the scene after clipping two fenders and a bumper in your reckless driving wake.”

    For all your car analogies, it seems like you forgot that accidents happen.

  94. My brother is the most conservative man I know. He’s in the Navy and heading to Iraq. He joined because of 9/11.

    And he reads approximately 120 books a year (some years more some a little less). His record is 150 books in a year. Some of them in a foreign language (German). His apartment looks like a freaking library. And since I’m helping to store all his stuff while he’s overseas, obviously I’m reading most of his books as well.

    The thing that’s important is not how much we read, but what we read. Personally, my favorite subject to read is military history, and sometimes world history. But then that’s what I got my degree in. And right now? For the fourth time I’m reading “The Columbia History of the World.” 1800 pages. See, I may not read as many books as a liberal, but that’s because I read books that take months to complete.

  95. For all your car analogies, it seems like you forgot that accidents happen.

    Yes, and people die. I blame George Bush.

  96. Lieutenant Worf! Eat any good books lately?

  97. whoops I slipped and my penis accidentally ejaculated in her vagina, I need emergency contraceptive STAT!

  98. The Orthodox tithe.

  99. “whoops I slipped and my penis accidentally ejaculated in her vagina, I need emergency contraceptive STAT!”

    Actually the way it works is she needs it. so it sounds a bit more like “that jon asshole is an unreliable fuck. I need emergency contraceptive STAT.” Because maybe Jon just doesn’t know how to put or keep on a rubber. Or maybe it was just an accident.

  100. Hey – thanks for the link, JG!

    I almost forgot that I wrote that post.

    :-)

  101. Or maybe she just doesn’t want to accept that having sex with just a condom is reckless behavior, and is really just as much an irresponsible fuck as that Jon asshole.

  102. I’m still not sure what to make of this, really – of course it is to be used as a cudgel against the Right because, I suppose, reading one more book a year of indeterminate value reinforces Leftist self-aggrandizing dogma. My experience, however, is that your choice of occupation bears a great deal upon how many “books” you read.

    For example, I am an attorney working in commercial litigation. Marcotte is a Barista, I believe. I am on the Right, and she, on the Left. Fair enough. My weeks require a minimum of sixty hours in office, not counting business and professional development and such. I am not certain of a Barista’s weekly workload.

    Now, I probably have not hit the average of books read even for conservatives, although I do like to read and have read many books in the past.

    I would probably grant that Marcotte meets or exceeds the liberal average. Again, fair enough.

    From reading pandagon, I gather that Marcotte’s latest read was the final Harry Potter book.

    On my nightstand is Venedikian’s Fourth Edition of Export/Import Financing, in 496 glorious pages. Most nights I’m a little “read out” at quittin’ time anyway.

    I would submit that there is a qualitative difference between the books above, and that the latter requires greater discipline and attention –and thus time – on the part of the reader.

    Further, my work requires copious reading in and of itself. Maybe the Barista manual counts as a book, I don’t know, but I read reference materials, statutes, and reported cases – pretty much every day.

    So, really, who reads “more?” Does it matter that my reading concerns the “stuff of life,” of industry and building and making and doing? And Marcotte reads – more or less – a comic book without pictures?

  103. “Or maybe she just doesn’t want to accept that having sex with just a condom is reckless behavior, and is really just as much an irresponsible fuck as that Jon asshole.”

    She’ll be the one taking the contraceptive regardless. Jon will just get to stand there deciding who is being irresponsible and whether he was misusing the condom or not. Or maybe he prefers to sit around tsk tsking. Around this time she will start to realize it was an irresponsible mistake to be involved with this jon character indeed. Because his character is really showing.

  104. Emergency contraception – I just love the euphemism created by the Left. Pro-choice. Support the troops. The list is practically endless. They abuse the English language, and are aided by their ideological brethren in the media.

  105. That Jon asshole, probably is waiting for her to commit to a relationship, rather than jumping in the sack with every Tom, Dick and Harry that gives her a nod.

    We can go on with this vein, or realize that sexual contact is a choice, and in taking that choice, several responsibilities are contingent on both parties, and there is a set of behaviors that while maybe not mainstream, are 100% effective in creating an environment where ‘emergency contraception’ isn’t required.

    Among those are:
    1. Keep your dick in your pants
    2. Keep your legs crossed

    (I’m willing to accept there is a violent reason for said emergency, where the lass in question might have been forced into intercourse (i.e. rape).

    But the dialog seems to suggest that the ‘emergency contraceptive’ akin to popping viagra 3 times a day to keep all the ladies in the harem satisfied. )

  106. “Among those are:
    1. Keep your dick in your pants
    2. Keep your legs crossed”

    And if you don’t drive, you won’t get in a car accident. Thanks for coming round full circle.

    “But the dialog seems to suggest that the ‘emergency contraceptive’ akin to popping viagra 3 times a day to keep all the ladies in the harem satisfied. )”

    Maybe in your social circles. For me, its for accidents. For people who see a reasonable thing somewhere between ‘100% effective’ and ‘reckless behavior.’ For people who see a middle between the 100% effective not driving and reckless driving.

  107. eh.. you were once a cute little zygote.

  108. “eh.. you were once a cute little zygote.”

    I thought there had to be something going on behind all that tsk tsking and talk of recklessness of anything other than 100%. You should just have come out and said it instead of sounding stupid.

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