January 2, 2013

Why have a Republican Party?

Rather than beat myself up trying to come up with new ways to express my disgust for the GOP this morning, allow me to just repeat a few things I wrote to Twitter last evening once the House passed the Senate “fiscal cliff” bill — itself a nightmare — without any changes, and then add a few more observations that I’ve since decided to share.

1. We have a one party country. The rest is theater to keep the fund raising going. It’s time to either fight back or give up. Pick one.

2. 2010 was a wake-up call, alright. It told the ruling class on both sides of the aisle that it had better get to work killing off the teabaggers. That is, we the people who can’t begin to understand the nuances of a government by and for us.

3. We expected it from Boehner — and we knew Cantor and McCarthy would maneuver for appearances once the leadership had the votes. But I’d like to thank Paul Ryan for graciously putting on a condom before sticking his dick in our asses. For the “prudence.” A classy move, that.

4. The Republican Party has now managed, in the course of Boehner’s speakership, to become both “the party of the rich” and the party that votes along with Dems to raise taxes on producers and small business owners; they have managed to turn the Bush tax rates into “the Obama tax cuts for the middle class” — even though Obama didn’t cut any rates, but instead kept the Bush rates, except where he got bipartisan support to raise those rates on families who make $450K a year or more, that is, people who were already responsible for paying over 90% of federal income tax; and they have now legitimated the Marxist class warfare paradigm Obama and the left have set up — punishing producers in order to redistribute wealth to those preferred Democrat clients, using the government as a mob-like intermediary; and they did all this without getting any real cuts in spending, increasing the governmental debt limit (leading to a credit downgrade), and never once addressing the “one-time stimulus” that has now become part of the baseline budget in perpetuity, it would seem.

5. After all this, the hardest they plan to fight is to retain John Boehner as their leader — either that, or use the phony vote of Cantor to try to appease conservatives and move him into the position, where he’ll then act just as Boehner has, just as Paul Ryan has, just as the whole disgusting mass of them have, save a small cadre of conservative representatives who have stuck to their principles, and for which they’ve been attacked, demoted, molested, and demonized — largely by their own party.

6. We the people, many of us, are now unrepresented in Congress. These tax hikes are not in our name; this spending is not in our name; the coming “compromise” on gun control — which will come, either in the way of superficial feel-good legislation (“high capacity magazine bans”), or in the way of something far more draconian (the next iteration of an “assault weapons ban,” whereby assault weapons are redefined as those weapons that the government first wishes to take away from you on its way to a registry that will lead, ultimately, to confiscation) — is most assuredly not in our name, nor will be the police state that is necessary to enforce such measures.

7. There is a very good chance the House will turn the power of the purse over to the Executive, through legislative fiat that they will be powerless to fight. No one in the Senate will proceed with an impeachment attempt. And frankly, neither party will much care: a permanent ruling elite — a kind of democratic-looking tyrannical despotism, wherein the rulers occasionally change nominal party markers — is what they’ve set up, and we are now subjects, to be taxed, molested, managed, coerced, coaxed, and dictated to.

8. The experiment in representative government is over — at least, so long as no drastic changes are made. Some suggestions: term limit every member of Congress; sunset every law and regulation, so that every five years or so Congress has to re-vote on each law it passes, and the regulatory agencies have to re-introduce every one of their regulations; term limit SCOTUS members — or else require that a settled form of interpretive methodology be used in the consideration of legal questions. Stare decisis should be a dead letter; rescind the 17th Amendment and return equal power to the states, a prospect further aided by a recognition that we have a 9th and 10th amendment, as well; make sure every governor elected henceforth holds to the pledge that s/he will put the interests of the citizens of his or her state over the interests of the federal government — the teeth of which will come through refusal to enforce federal law that the harms the state, including nullification of SC decisions that, eg., disallow them to protect their borders.

9. See number 1: either we as the people for whom and by whom this government is assembled fight to retain our natural rights by rebuking those who have sold them out for a client-government relationship that allows them to steal from us under the aegis of law, or we submit.

I honestly can’t see any other way. We are witnessing the momentum of the New Left’s long-time plan to crash the capitalist system and replace it with a form of Marxism that adopts the liberal fascist model — the draw for which is that the government never dissipates, it merely joins with big business to destroy competition, control pricing, and enforce a model whereby erstwhile free people become subjects to a putatively benevolent State, having surrendered natural rights and the fiction of individual autonomy for the “greater good” of the “organic government whole.”

That is, the Leviathan.

It has become de rigueur to sniff that the question of secession has been settled. But so, too, had the question of natural rights and the preeminence of the individual and individual freedom. Actively working to subvert and rearrange the relationship between the government and the people necessitates a response that lets the government know that we the people won’t merely accept their wholesale changes to the social contract — all of which empower them and take away our natural rights, turning them into privileges granted or denied at the point of a gun.

To put this inelegantly but forcefully, shit is getting real. And yes, it can happen here, if we continue to allow it.

My advice? Download or get hold of a physical copy of the Constitution. Because we’re going to need it to reorganize when the logistical soft-civil war I predicted nearly 8 years ago goes into full swing.

Organic attempts at this have long been tried. But like locusts, progressives destroy one state, then move to more conservative and fiscally responsible states and upset the voting numbers, taking over, and then devastating the next fertile field before moving on yet again.

Either you are a constitutionalist or you aren’t. If you aren’t, then in the most important ways you are anti-American. As such, you are my enemy — and a person looking to enslave me, my children, and those who matter most to me.

Which reminds me: I’ve banned our latest troll, slipshod, because as the New Year dawns, I’m not interested in “arguing” with such sophists. I only want them beaten down and forced to leave me be.

Posted by Jeff G. @ 9:34am
109 comments | Trackback

Comments (109)

  1. You’ve nailed it. This Republic, isn’t, anymore.

  2. Pingback: Disgust

  3. For the same reason we have a Washington Generals

    that’s why.

  4. Well said.

    One of the primary reasons for the Republicans lack of leadership is the lack of individual leaders, who have sufficient character and charisma, behind whom the Republicans can rally and make a case against all of this spending and taxing and the encroachment of socialism. Its crazy that Boehner and company haven’t really bothered to explain the reasons why raising taxes on anyone, including the rich, is bad, or how raising those taxes will not produce even remotely sufficient revenue to deal with our looming debt crisis. If one leader emerged, who could be blunt and at least explain, in simple terms, why the Republican position is what it is, we’d certainly have a better chance reaching low information voters.

    Democrats have habit of thrusting a leader into the spotlight and then supporting that leader, no matter how incompetent that leader is or how many bad decisions that leader makes. One would think that blind support is a bad thing, but it allowed Bill CLinton and Obama to become and remain President, no matter what they did while in office. Its a shame the Republicans can’t find that one person to rally behind.

  5. I’ve banned our latest troll, slipshod, because as the New Year dawns, I’m not interested in “arguing” with such sophists. I only want them beaten down and forced to leave me be.

    But he torments us without end for our own good Jeff.

  6. I’d say the bigger problem is a lack of guiding principle rather than a lack of character and charisma in the Republican leadership, such as it is.

    Although I suppose principles might fall under the character rubric.

  7. We don’t often return to the central questions underlying our political order, i.e. the primary questions of human nature so drastically altered by the progressives, altered as a basis upon which to attack the answers simply assumed by the founding generation, and under the regime of which new stances — and answers in response to those stances — the progressive political left has constructed the anti-Constitutional path of every institution upon which they have laid their hands (education, journalism, politics [in all its branches], religion, etc.). In some respects, I believe, the very difficulty of the matter may stand in the way of grasping, in the first instance (that is, at the initiation of the onslaught by the progressives 100 years ago), who they were and what they were up to, and even down to today as the progressive fog beclouds any certainty as to what they propose in policy (specifying beyond, of course, the tyranny to which progressivism as such aspires). It’s not a simple pasttime, thinking about the fundamental questions of human nature or the right conduct of human life. Yet, on the other hand, it does seem to be about as inescapable a necessity as any that comes to mind, at least where any politics (in the broadest sense of the term) is concerned.

    George Will spoke at Washington University back in early Dec. last, and his ‘lecture’ is getting some promotion here and there. As a summation of the history of our political philosophy, it’s not bad, I think. Here’s the text (from which his delivered remarks varied somewhat, mostly in the way of filling out). And here’s a video of the talk (Will begins about 08:20 into the recording, if you wish to skip the introductory business).

  8. Time to compost the annoying orange… Don’t cry over it Boehner! And Paul Ryan should definitely not be on the short list.

    Third party or reform of the existing GOP, either will be about equally difficult. Six vs. half a dozen. Half empty half full.

    The best time to have planted an oak tree is forty years ago…the second best time is now.

  9. Some suggestions: term limit every member of Congress

    Or, as I first proposed elsewhere this morning because that’s where it occurred to me: require every member of Congress to have a job in his district that requires his attendance there not less than 200 days a year.

    This “full-time Congress” bullshit may not be what’s killing us all by itself, but it sure has helped turn our “representatives” into agents of Leviathan.

  10. sunset every law and regulation

    They will vote to continue the bad ones and let lapse the good ones.

    As for term limits, that removes their incentive to listen (at least nominally) to the electorate. Of Utah’s five congresscritters, only the one who said he wouldn’t run again (Hatch) voted for the Manure Sub.

    Washington is beyond reform at this point. It will have to be voted off the island, swept clean, and replaced before it’s useful again. And even then, only after all of the various entitlements (from farm subsidies to Obamaphones) have been phased out (or have collapsed under their own weight).

    Human society always “progresses” to this point. It will take another exceptional effort to restore ourselves to our former principles.

  11. It occired to me while at the gun show this weekend ( where I purchased a Remington 1911 R1 .45) that without the right to bear arms, the right to self defense, almost all of the other enumerated rights and those not enumerated in the 9th and 10th amends have little or no meaning. Without the right to bear arms I must rely on the good graces of the government police powers to defend my right to speak or practice my religion. And what if the government (the majority definition) doesn’t like my speech? I guess the bill of rights is only there to protect the majority; but for the right to bear arms.

    The second thing that occured to me was that at the time the founders drafted and ratified the 2nd amendment the weapons held by the people were not unlike the weapons held by the army. Hell, they were one and the same for the most part. That insight made me realize just how watered down the 2nd amend has become and just how screwed the people are. We only have the rights that the government majority will allow us to have. Black is white etc….

  12. Seems to me that the same troll or trolls have been coming here for years under a number of different identities… Who was slipshod before he/she was slipshod? Is that the same person that was Nishi back in the day?

  13. You DO get a pretty dang good quality of troll over here at PW, you have to admit… Sharp.. No mere crap slingers these guys..

  14. The Virginia Declaration of Rights: 1776 [largely penned by George Mason]

    Amendments Proposed by the Virginia Convention, June 27, 1788 [attended and argued by George Mason]

    And these two precursors to the 2nd. Amendment of the US Constitution, respectively, contained therein:

    V . D. of R. 1776: “SEC. 13. That a well-regulated militia, or composed of the body of the people, trained to arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defense of a free state; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided as dangerous to liberty; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.”

    Amndmts Prpsd 1788: “Seventeenth, That the people have a right to keep and bear arms; that a well regulated Militia composed of the body of the people trained to arms is the proper, natural and safe defence of a free State. That standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty, and therefore ought to be avoided, as far as the circumstances and protection of the Community will admit; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to and governed by the Civil power.”

    Now what was, I believe, taken to be implicit in the Virginia Declaration of Rights (namely, that the people individually possess the right: see Sec. 1 “. . . and safety”) has been drawn forth to be stated explicitly in the Proposed Amendments — or this, I think, would account for the difference.

  15. Third party or reform of the existing GOP, either will be about equally difficult. Six vs. half a dozen. Half empty half full.

    I’d say start a new party – the GOP “brand” is as irrevocably damaged as the Whigs these days.

    If it weren’t already taken, “Constitution Party” would have been a good name…

  16. Or, as I first proposed elsewhere this morning because that’s where it occurred to me: require every member of Congress to have a job in his district that requires his attendance there not less than 200 days a year.

    I’ve long advocated a “spend some time in the real world” clause that states that candidates running for an elective office must not have held office or a government job for a period of time equal to the length of the term prior to the election.

    i.e. If someone wanted to run for the House in 2014, they would have to not be in office or work for a government agency since 2012. For the Senate, 2008. For the Presidency, 2010. (Exceptions, of course, for candidates running for re-election subject to term limits).

  17. I am jettisoning the GOP. Time for a third party. We’re going to be in the wilderness, regardless, so let the Dems break the country, let the GOP pretend to fight. By the time it’s over, we’ll either have a viable third party or a viable second country.

  18. By the time it’s over, we’ll either have a viable third party or a viable second country.

    I wish I could say I didn’t think the latter a more practical approach. As I said once before in another thread long ago: my allegiance is to a Constitution that limits federal power. If I can have that back in the USA, fine. If not…

  19. Nishi was her own special griefer. Slipshod was not nishi. Slipshod was, however, the reincarnation of a troll who has been here for years.

  20. As to the topic, I think we’ve been moving this way for a while, and since the party did not (and perhaps could not) correct itself, we find ourselves in a dilemma. I think the notion of a second country, one that hews to the constitution, is very likely the best answer, because if they come after the guns in red states, not just banning new manufacture but requiring registration from current owners, they will make millions of innocent people criminals at the stroke of a pen. That won’t go over well in flyover country.

    As far as the intent of the Second Amendment goes, the most reasonable interpretation is that we are intended to be as well-armed as the average serviceman, which means M16s and their derivatives, all with selective fire, should not only be legal but easy to obtain.

  21. Term limits mean, for one thing, that in their last term a politician is a lame duck for the entire term. Bad politicians who have become lame ducks are inclined to do their worst bits then.

  22. If you combine the effect of; Obamacare’s solution for the elderly ill of “just take the pill” and slowly die off without costing the system much money, with the part of the Feinstein gun control legislation which says that anyone owning one of the registered firearms may not sell or transfer it to anyone even to an heir when they die, you end up with a huge number of 70-80-something terminally ill heavily armed berserkers with nothing to lose who will blame a certain Party for it all.

  23. I’d long been opposed to term limits, but no longer. If lame-duck congresspeople want to try shit like that, fine. It will influence who we elect to fix it. Also, some local shunning and displeasure should be levied upon the lame-duck despot once s/he tries to return home.

    But career politicians were never the intent. So while I’m all for term limits now, I’d be first for making pols stay in their own home districts. Let them use Skype like the rest of us.

  24. Pingback: Bob’s New Year’s Message: End Of Days « The Camp Of The Saints

  25. With all due respect, the problem isn’t the politicans, but the people. The people have become so debased that they are buying into the class warfare on offer by the Left. They are now more into “fairness” than liberty. While the degradation of the educational system and the Gramscian long march through the institutions have done their respective parts, more than anything else, the long term bribery of the middle class that started with the New Deal has coopted many that now find the luxury of a government paycheck or handout a necessity and cannot imagine living within their means. We can see the rot and corruption through all levels of the political, and it must be said the capitalist, structures where vote buying, proxy bribery, and crony capitalism have become dominant and entrenched.

    Neither term limits nor a third party are going to fix anything until the people desire liberty and are willing to do what is necessary to obtain and maintain it. I’m not particularly hopeful since the Founders saw what could happen when the founding documents were written and warned us, but, of course, we’re so much smarter now.

  26. That’s an argument for limiting terms to the briefest duration then. Lest a growing sense of entitlement lead to resentment at the prospect of entitlement’s loss.

    More probably, it’s an argument for repealing the 17 and removing the entirely artificial and extra-constitutional law that limits the House to 435 members.

  27. These pinheads aren’t even really politicians in the sense of being real policy makers or statesmen. They are just professional fund raisers and campaigners.

    Yeah. Limit them all to one term.

  28. I just now ran into this story about Musicorps. While it is in some respects presented in a “heart-string” plucking manner (but hey, why not?), it puts me in mind of Tocqueville’s insight into the unique American political character, and the forge there of our salvation from the fate of other nations: private associations.

  29. But career politicians were never the intent. So while I’m all for term limits now, I’d be first for making pols stay in their own home districts. Let them use Skype like the rest of us.

    This ^^^. Perhaps if they didn’t invite each other to parties, and refer to each other as “their good friend”, they’d be able think a tad more clearly.

    And Boehner telling Harry Reid to fuck off doesn’t fool me one bit.

  30. Neither term limits nor a third party are going to fix anything until the people desire liberty and are willing to do what is necessary to obtain and maintain it.

    But there are a substantial number of people who DO desire liberty, and a substantial number more who believe they do, and just don’t realize they are voting it away. That’s the natural coalition.

    The GOP? Not it. State nullification? Maybe the answer.

  31. : I’ve banned our latest troll, slipshod,

    /single tear rolls down my cheek.

  32. Maybe we should have a retention election/referendum at the end of every Session?

    Shall so and so continue in Office?

    Campaigns are already permanent. Might as well have the elections to go with them.

  33. Grover Norquist and Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) surprise me the most in all this. I have a hard time accepting that holding the line on some taxes is all we can get when it’s literally within our power to cut spending to zero. To hear the happy talk about how this takes taxes off the table and spending is now the only political terrain left has me (not literally) speechless.

    Shitty end/start to the years for Wisco, btw. Johnson and Ryan vote for this and… the Packers lose to the Vikings and the Badgers lose to Stanford. Now all we need is another blizzard and I’m going into no-shaving, whiskey-for-dinner mode.

  34. ” Obamacare’s solution for the elderly ill of “just take the pill” and slowly die off without costing the system much money”

    Well, I suppose a pill is better than just letting the old people die of thirst, as they’re doing in the UK.

  35. Many states retain their judges on just such a vote, though admittedly not after every session or the judicial equivalent. I think you might be disappointed at how frequently we get new judges. Inertia is quite powerful and the bar for throwing someone out is very high.

  36. No offense bh, but I hope the pain continues through at least Saturday.

    Not that I’m holding my breath.

  37. None taken, Ernst. If you didn’t root for the Vikings you’d be even worse than a Vikings fan. [Insert pic of politician wearing a Yankees hat after moving to run for office in NY here.]

    Congrats on Peterson’s year, btw. He’s frickin’ amazing.

  38. Just trying to throw out some suggestions. Others include invoking Article V, principled non-voting, or principled anti-incumbent voting.

    Or maybe we just go to the mattresses.

  39. I thought the NFL season was over already?

  40. Many Lions’ fans don’t realize this but there are indeed some games played after the regular season, Carin.

    I kid, I kid.

  41. sdferr, thanks for the link to George Will’s address. Sadly his writing of late gave me no reason to attend, but I wish I had been there now.

  42. 8 yards shy of the best ever, though.

    With two time outs and 27 ticks left on the clock!

    But then, sometimes he doesn’t know when to give up, so….

    (That’s arguably the second time the coaches have screwed him out of a record, by the way).

  43. Many Lions’ fans don’t realize this but there are indeed some games played after the regular season, Carin.

    I’ve heard such tales, but assumed it was a myth.

  44. Jeff, I think there are fewer than you imagine. I hope I’m wrong.

    And Milton Friedman supported my earlier statement about the politicans not being the problem, or vice versa, in a roundabout manner.

  45. I’ve heard such tales, but assumed it was a myth.

    Growing up with the Chargers made me think this, too. Eventually they made it and, of course, choked.

  46. But career politicians were never the intent. So while I’m all for term limits now, I’d be first for making pols stay in their own home districts. Let them use Skype like the rest of us.

    Unless automated speech-to-text transcription has dramatically improved, I’d much rather see them communicate in writing only. With said writing automatically archived for public access (and without the “right to revise and extend my remarks” nonsense).

  47. A word about the locusts: I saw the invasion at work firsthand in a Northern Arizona county Board of Supervisors meeting two years ago.

    Here’s how it worked: a meeting was called by Coconino county’s B-o’Soops and residents were invited to attend. Sounds innocuous, huh? But wait!

    When I arrived a blank sheet of paper was circulated on which attendees were asked to sign their names and add contact information like a phone number or some such. I did so thinking the sheet was the meeting’s registration of attendance. About 40 minutes into the meeting I learned it was nothing of the sort. Instead, it was a petition to generate a new property tax for an as yet unapproved fire district.

    Why was this a problem? The meeting was stacked with employees of the Grand Canyon National Park…most of whom live on park campuses in Park- (ie. tax-payer-) subsidized housing, and only rotate through the state on short assignments (2 years is the average stint-length for Delaware-ans, Connecticut-ers and Vermonters at the GCNP). Like so many who travail in Flagstaff’s federal agencies, from the USGS to the Forest Service to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, these people were not ‘residents’ per se, and if I tried to vote in their local New England elections against, say, an “assault weapons” ban, they’d be pissed. But, still, there they were. Worse, many park employees are “exchange” employees from places like Japan, Italy and Bulgaria; the thick accented chatter all around me confirmed my fears. These people have no business voting in local county and state elections!

    And, to my horror, when the next year’s property tax bill arrived, there was the new tax for me to pay: a host of Federal employee non-residents just ‘voted’ to create a permanent taxing authority that I am bound by law to pay, and that will never, ever fetter them!

    In this example, the locusts worked with moneyed Democrat players (can you say “Babbits?”) to lash Arizona citizens to a tax that the players deemed necessary to their larger plans in the region. Namely, those of expanding insured access to the park under the protections of another IAFF-unionized roadside fire station. The tip-off came midway when the fire-marshall recruited from a SE AZ county stated that fire departments’ primary role these days is in assisting police and sheriffs at auto-wrecks. According to him, only 25% of station calls are for house fires! So much for servicing the needs of property owners and home owners in the county, huh? This was a sop to the Park and the Democrats county machine!

    So, to rehash the technique: 1. Stack the meeting with locust wards, many of them foreign or otherwise ineligible to participate, 2. Get the attendees to blind-sign an untitled ballot initiative (the suckers don’t even know what they’re signing!), 3. Do not verify residency of any of the signors (that would have been labeled xenophobic by the Alinskyite Left), 4. Use the gathered signatures – ostensibly gathered properly at a community meeting – to justify the Democrats’ agenda item, whatever it is.

    I asked the B-o’ Soops what I had just signed, and relayed that I thought it was the meeting registration. It was so clear that I was disgruntled about the improper process the Soops were following that they scratched a line thru it. And sure enough this was noticed, and when I was leaving the meeting, I was cornered by a brutish, overweight firefighter guy who grabbed my shoulder, gave it squeeze, and said (I’ll never forget his warning): “Everyone’s going to NEED to do his part.” The menace of it was conveyed by his hand on my shoulder – no one barring my own Dad in a stern moment, ever laid hands on me like that. Dad had a right to, but this thug? No!

    As a prologue to this overly long complaint, I voted with my feet. ‘Pulled up shop and moved to a red county in the SE of the state. It was my only option. I cannot battle city hall by myself, and I’m not a Warren Buffet, or a Bruce Babbit, or a Bill Gates, so there was no option of litigating to track the multiple crimes at this meeting. It’s easier just to move and try again somewhere else. And that’s how the locusts won one for the IAFF and a Federal park system!

    Disgusting, huh?

  48. cranky-d,

    Nishi was her own special griefer. Slipshod was not nishi. Slipshod was, however, the reincarnation of a troll who has been here for years.

    “Thor” was one of his names, wasn’t it? I sure he’ll be back to shoot spitwads from the back of the class soon enough…

  49. I think this was Alfie, the balloon fence guy.

  50. I don’t think so Leigh. Alfie/monkey boy of the balloon fence fame was more sarcastic. And definitely NOT Thor, he was more caustic. I’m thinking our old friend from Murfreesboro Tennessee.

  51. Personally, I think there were three distinct slipperyslopes.

  52. Yelverton or elfboi? He didn’t talk about music at all, so no Yelverton. Elfboi may have come up with a different personae.

    I detected different styles with the slipknot, too, so of course Ernst may be right there.

  53. I’m pouring out a forty for my old pal slippy. Sure, it’s cooking oil instead of fortified malt liquor, and I’m pouring it into an old flower pot. But it’s the thought that counts to folks like slippy, not the details and consequences. That’s for the small minds to worry and fuss over. Right on, right on.

  54. I think Elfboi would have been brought the antisemitism.

  55. “three distinct slipperyslopes.”

    Asshole, roommate, and girlfriend? DaleKHunter trying gin up a sock puppet choir gradually?

  56. steveaz says January 2, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    that is incredible. It’s probably happening everywhere. As the locusts leave california, they take the Marxist garbage with them. I saw it in San Antonio. Colorado is turning yuck. I left the misery of Ohio but now I live in SC, where there are more welfare dependents than taxpayers already. The unemployment and poverty and ignorance of our country and it’s history is astounding.

    Just tonight my daughter said they are studying how our constitution protects us from tyranny – and I had to explain to her that it was *supposed* to protect us from tyranny. It’s the best that men could do, no doubt. And it’s had a pretty good run.

    I do not see a good future on the horizon.

  57. I smell Yelverton, don’t taste Thor. Alfie/monkeyboy? I say no. Could be a new one though.

  58. Q: Why have a Republican Party?

    A: Because the Democrats need a Mortimer Snerd?

  59. Why have a Republican Party?

    So guys like David Frum can pretend they’re not Democrats, silly.

  60. As for the true identity of this or that troll, I’m perfectly okay with knowing the species and nothing more: Common Domesticated Jackass.

  61. Say hey, Outlaws. The Hillary fell down and broke her crown story gets some

    dirt kicked on it.

    Friend of hubby’s sent it to him. He’s a reliable source, so make of it what you will.

  62. That is crazy shit leigh. Disconcertingly, I believe it as much as anything coming out of the western press.

    Not sure why they would think the story she fainted, fell down, and bumped her head was better though.

  63. It’s pretty sad when we can find the Russians and the EU papers more believable than our own.

    I, for one, think it’s the truth. If anyone else needs tinfoil, I have plenty.

  64. “Not sure why they would think the story she fainted, fell down, and bumped her head was better though.”

    Well it obscures that she might have been meeting with Iran secretly. (If true.)

  65. It explains the SEAL’s “suicide”, as well. I never believed that one for a minute.

    This is treason, if it’s true and POTUS is covering it up.

  66. But career politicians were never the intent. So while I’m all for term limits now, I’d be first for making pols stay in their own home districts. Let them use Skype like the rest of us.

    That’s the other horse I’ve been flogging forever. Instead of drinking with each other and those interests who seek to influence them, let them run into you and me when they go out at night. Maybe once a year they can get together, if they’re chaperoned.

  67. It’s funny, Pablo. True story: went out to my neighborhood brew pub last night, where our mayor, like me, likes to hang out. I pulled him aside and asked him about the 13 mayors who’d signed on to Governor Hickenlooper’s gun ban initiative. He pulled out his bill fold, opened it up, and in the center was a concealed carry permit.

    That’s all that needed to be said.

  68. Sometimes a man of few words can be just that eloquent.

  69. Now that’s a leader.

  70. We need chaperones to sit between lobbyists and lawmakers when they meet.

  71. That’s all that needed to be said.

    See, that’s the kind of guy you want teleconferencing with the DC fuckwits on your behalf.

  72. That EU paper isn’t very reliable at all.

    Seriously, why would they be sending Hillary on a top secret mission to Iran?

  73. Seriously, why would they be sending Hillary on a top secret mission to Iran?

    Duh, so she could get conked on the head. These people are nothing if they aren’t deep planners.

  74. He pulled out his bill fold, opened it up, and in the center was a concealed carry permit.

    That’s all that needed to be said.

    He have any gubernatorial ambitions?

  75. And if not, why not?

  76. You’re represented to the extent that you’ve won seats. Tea party Republicans haven’t won a majority of seats. If you use the fingers and toes of 3 neighbors, you can confirm this counting fact yourownself.

    There are other Republicans – many of whom come from purplish states – that consider you to be crazier than a shithouse rat – and aren’t particularly interested in you showering them with your accolades. These are guys who might have won a reelection or two and might have a better plan than you to win their next one.

    If you want representation that can change the outcome, you need to win more seats – not just bang on the shatterproof glass of the rhinos that would gore you if you tried to pet them.

  77. If you want representation that can change the outcome, you need to win more seats

    or fewer aholes like you in gen pop

  78. There are other Republicans – many of whom come from purplish states – that consider you to be crazier than a shithouse rat –

    So? There are plenty of blogs for them to hang out on and dicuss our mental (dis)abilities.

    You should join them.

  79. Obvious troll is obvious.

  80. Obvious troll is obvious.

    What Mike said.

  81. Jeff did say slippy would be back.

  82. He can’t quit us.

    How many posts before he tells us how we can never dream of being as fabulously wealthy as he? It’s weird how all trolls are well-heeled globe trotters, isn’t it?

  83. I like how leigh just chokes on the knowledge that a liberal has been much more successful than she has – what with her being so much smarter and all. I mean, how’s it even possible?

  84. Tell your story walking, loser.

  85. As if, loser.

  86. I’ll show you my long form if you show me yours (wink)

    And by long form I mean my very tiny penis.

  87. Bh, is this the same idiot who wanted to see your tax returns last time?

  88. It’s hard to tell these troubled souls apart, leigh.

    Think so but I’m not sure.

  89. I called it, though. Not even a half dozen posts and already telling us we’re not succesful.

    You’d think they’d get a fresher script.

  90. mattfrackingdamon says January 2, 2013 at 9:44 pm
    mattfrackingdamon says January 2, 2013 at 10:11 pm
    mattfrackingdamon says January 2, 2013 at 10:18 pm

    Fuck off.

  91. Well put, Dave.

  92. “McGehee says January 2, 2013 at 9:59 pm
    Jeff did say slippy would be back.”

    Yeah. So did common sense.

  93. I don’t think this could be any more perfect as a same- ???-marriage.

  94. “There are other Republicans – many of whom come from purplish states – that consider you to be crazier than a shithouse rat ”

    Yes, we consider them to be pussies are taking their seats away from them. They are not going quietly but they are going. Much like democratic governors. :)

  95. Geoffb, The Blaze made them an offer and they preferred to do business with Al Jazeeera.

  96. It’s a love match palaeomerus.

    In other cable related news.

    The Kickstarter funded documentary FrackNation will have its television premiere on January 22 at 9 p.m. ET on AXS TV.

  97. I don’t think this could be any more perfect[...]

    They’ll have to tone down their anti-American rhetoric now though.

  98. Al Jazeera did not disclose the purchase price, but people with direct knowledge of the deal pegged it at around $500 million, indicating a $100 million payout for Mr. Gore, who owned 20 percent of Current. Mr. Gore and his partners were eager to complete the deal by Dec. 31, lest it be subject to higher tax rates that took effect on Jan. 1, according to several people who insisted on anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly. But the deal was not signed until Wednesday.

  99. Jeff’s story and a certain unnamed snowbilly suggest that the mayoralty is the best breeding ground for constituent-connected politicians.

    Much better than the legislature, anyway…

  100. There are other Republicans – many of whom come from purplish states – that consider you to be crazier than a shithouse rat – and aren’t particularly interested in you showering them with your accolades.

    Right, because generational theft via eternal $1 trillion+ deficits is what sanity looks like. Idiot.

  101. These are guys who might have won a reelection or two and might have a better plan than you to win their next one.

    Aha! I see you’ve stumbled across the problem. It’s a matter of priorities.

  102. I’ll show you my long form if you show me yours (wink)

    And by long form I mean my very tiny penis.

    I don’t have a very tiny penis to show you, and I’ll take yours as a given.

  103. To go with the Hillary-Iran story.

    Personnel is policy. If Obama appoints Hagel, you’ll know what his policy is, regardless of what he says.

  104. Agreed, Slart. You’d need latex gloves just to touch the magnifying glass, since he undoubtedly needs to use it himself to find the damn thing.

    And there just isn’t that much hand sanitizer in the world, latex or not.

  105. Pingback: Leviathan and Civil Disobedience « Andrew J. Patrick

  106. But to answer the original question, because the Libertarians aren’t big enough to be the subject for the two minute hate?

  107. Ah, so slip is one of the pathetically obsessive ones who just have to keep flinging poo in the hopes that it hurts the people they hate.

    Because it’s what “wealthy” and “successful” folk do. ;-)

  108. Well, yeah Pat. When they aren’t playing Jenga in the dayroom, it’s what they do.

  109. Hmph. It’s amazing how trolls claim to be wealthy and successful and that that is why people are “jealous” and don’t like them, and yet their acting like complete douchebags via the anonymity of the internet is never considered a possiblity.

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