February 26, 2012

Did they really think a gun was hidden under the guy’s testicles? [Darleen Click]

Somewhere, Bloomberg is having an orgasm

OTTAWA – Jessie Sansone and his family are reeling after he was arrested and strip searched by police after his four-year-old daughter drew a picture of a man with a gun in her Kitchener, Ont., kindergarten class.

The 26-year-old father of four said Saturday the sketch was supposed to be him, getting the bad guys and monsters.

The school must have thought differently, as after Nevaeh drew it Wednesday, the school contacted Family and Children’s Services and they called police.

Waterloo Police met Sansone at the school when he tried to pick up his kids he was told he was charged with possession of a firearm. He was then handcuffed and put him in one of the several squad cars waiting outside, he said.[...]

While Sansone was being strip searched at the police station: told to disrobe, lift his testicles and bend over, his wife was home with their 15-month-old daughter.

“They came to my house, told my wife that I had been charged with possession of firearms, that she would have to come with them, and that Sundae (their infant daughter) would have to go with the social worker,” said Sansone. Stephanie called her Mom who rushed over to take Sundae instead.

“My littlest is still in diapers with a bottle. Thank goodness my mother-in-law lives nearby,” Sansone said.

Once Stephanie got to the police station she had to wait.

“The detective was giving my wife the idea that our children were at the police station with her, just in another room at the station. She was waiting for over an hour, close to two hours, not knowing where the kids were,” Sansone said.

His children had been at Family and Children’s Services, being interviewed by social workers.

“So, my wife was really panicking at that point. So her and the detective drove down to children’s services. They questioned each of my children.”

Now the family is trying their best to explain things to their kids. [...]

Sansone said police searched his house and found a plastic toy gun that shoots foam darts.

This is a great argument for public stocks, so all the vicious idiots (including the police officers and their commanders) who thought to make both a public example of this man and engage in outrageous humiliation of him can now be the subject of ridicule and not a few rotten vegetables.

O Canada!

Posted by Darleen @ 11:11am
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Comments (58)

  1. What is most disturbing to me is that the whole town wasn’t down there with torches and pitchforks and cranky cudgels demanding the entire police department be run out of town on rails and a new one installed.

    We get the government we deserve indeed.

  2. D’ya suppose the social psychologists have a name for this yet?

  3. I take that back, this is more disturbing to me:

    “When I was finally able to see my family, after this ordeal was over, my little girl ran up and gave me a hug me and asked: ‘Daddy, are you mad at me?’” said Sansone, his voice choked.

    They should tar and feather the bastards first.

  4. Neaveh? Sundae? Did this family escape to Canada from Kansas?

  5. This is Canada, isn’t it? And I should care about Canada why, exactly?

  6. sdferr

    So you think something like this doesn’t happen here?

    This anti-gun, All Your Children Belong Us, mentality of Big Nanny Gov is rampant on both sides of the border.

  7. I resist smearing out distinctions I find important and relevant Darleen.

    If something like that happens in the United States, I’ll think about and possibly act on it. But on the other side of an international border in a nation in which I take no part as citizen? Fuck no, it doesn’t concern me in the least, at least not as a matter of direct effect (though I may notice the story as story, note it and pass on by).

    And there are no direct correlations as a matter of law — so far anyhow — and indeed, insofar as we can tell, there is some substantial resistance to the insertion of the jurisprudential acts of foreign nations into the jurisprudential acts in the United States, despite the efforts of US progressives to make use of those foreign rulings, laws and behaviors.

  8. The greatest risk of totalitarianism comes not borne on hate or fear or envy or greed. It comes borne on the desire to do good — by physical force, if necessary.

  9. Sure, nothing that egregious has happened here, yet, sdferr,

    but how many kids, boys especially, have run afoul of the “caring” school bureaucracy by raising their thumbs, pointing their index fingers at one another, and saying “BANG!”?

  10. And there are no direct correlations as a matter of law

    I disagree. This incident directly parallels American policy and procedures.

    First off, gun ownership is not illegal in Canada.

    What happened here is that the teacher involved perceived a danger to the child and is required by law to report that danger up the chain of command.

    The principal then called CPS who called the police and (as I’m reading their own defense of their actions) all they are doing is erring on the side of what is best for the children.

    ALL of this is in place in the US and has been used before (and will again). This is just the latest example as so egregiously wrong that it needs to be pointed out and the Left-liberal knee-jerkiness behind it mocked.

  11. We’ve plenty of other more salient current affairs to which to devote our attention, I think, Ernst, than non-existent but potential absurdities to be perpetrated by stupid people at some possible time in the future (sure to come, no doubt! let’s worry!) . And I think surely, while manifold and far more egregious absurdities are enacted here every day, day after day, we’d do better to husband our limited resources to focus on our own national and local affairs.

  12. I mean, for fuck’s sake, it’s raining in Daytona!

  13. Canada has some of the most restrictive gun control laws in the world. U.S. progressives cite their laws as being a model for what they’d like the U.S. to adapt. Therefore, seeing stories like this one should serve as a warning to U.S. citizens to keep Canada’s craziness as far at bay as possible.

    Australia’s and Great Insufferable Britain’s laws as well.

  14. D’ya suppose the social psychologists have a name for this yet?

    Make-work.

  15. What happened here is that the teacher involved perceived a danger to the child and is required by law to report that danger up the chain of command.

    He was male; a father. I’d bet the LEO’s were just itching for him to make sudden moves. Parenting is war, after all, and the State knows best.

    Bang, bang, bang and you know the press story even before it’s written.

  16. Social workers are not psychologists.

  17. Two peas in a cash-fueled statist pod, leigh, indistinguisable in their potential and kinetic threat to original, personal rights.

  18. “We’ve plenty of other more salient current affairs to which to devote our attention”

    like the feds inspecting children’s lunches

  19. I’m sure your right sdferr.

    I mean, it’s not like anyone here in the good ol’ U. S. of A. looks to Canada as a model to be emulated or anything.

  20. If one were to chart a trend in US high court rulings concerning second amendment associated cases generally, what would it look like? Would it look to be moving in Canada’s direction? Or would it look to be moving away from Canada’s position on firearms right and related self-defense right? I think the latter, with more of that in store and in process of adjudication, though of course only time and further rulings will tell the whole story (while even that story can’t be assumed to reach a permanent stasis).

    Still, this is an area of law more hopeful than less in the US with regard to the properly understood intent of our Constitutional order.

  21. And to answer your original question, Darleen, no they did not. They were only deploying a situationally appropriate ball inspection.

  22. Social workers are not psychologists.

    And firearms aren’t an illness

    but that sure hasn’t slowed down the CDC.

    (Which I susppose is only indirectly relevant).

  23. If one were to chart a trend in US high court rulings concerning second amendment associated cases generally, what would it look like? Would it look to be moving in Canada’s direction? Or would it look to be moving away from Canada’s position on firearms right and related self-defense right? I think the latter…

    Barry thanks you for not noticing his bid for reelection, sdferr. Or the bid he’s making that’ll depend entirely on his reelection.

    And we thought Obamacare was historic.

  24. What are you talking about “not noticing his bid for reelection” JHo? Don’t be such a putz.

  25. I’m in favor of high dudgeon and heaping scorn in this instance because it let’s the nanny’s know we’re watching.

    And I think JHo is suggesting that trends can be reversed, depending on who wins and who retires/expires.

  26. JHo can’t help himself, sdferr and neither can Ernst.

  27. Somebody ought to start a fund to help Jessie Sansone and his family immigrate to the U.S. as refugees from a hostile regime.

  28. Making your final term’s stated intent finally wiping out the second amendment, now that would be strong putz.

    Not regarding it as such? As questionable as expecting the Courts to do with it what they’ve yet to do about Obamacare.

  29. Involuntary reason just ekes out of my every pore, leigh.

  30. And I think JHo is suggesting that trends can be reversed, depending on who wins and who retires/expires.

    Fine, Ernst, JHo can suggest whatever he likes without attributing some sort of moronic disregard to my comments. I mean, do you Ernst, think I’ve unlearned, in any sense, that the reelection of Barack Obama could have a potentially profound effect on the make-up of the Supreme Court of the United States? Or do you believe that it is necessary that I make mention of the fact in every possible context, lest I be thought negligent? That’s fucking absurd, and insulting.

  31. I think anything that increases the average per capita totalitarianism on the planet where I live, is worth commenting on and opposing.

    After all, some in our own country feel constrained from doing right for fear of being sued. And speaking out against government overreach qualifies as doing good, IMHO.

  32. Easy big guy. Proof by reputation cuts nothing but ice with me, baby.

  33. …putzing as it may be…

  34. McGehee, it is not just being sued, it is being killed. It’s legal in my state to carry a handgun in one’s vehicle. People did it before it was legal.

  35. I’m with McGehee on this – pour encourager les autres… or, rather, discourager(?)

  36. It may be Canada, but the eagerness of state operatives to question children in an attempt to get them to inform on their parents is all to common here. The anti-gun aspect does not rile me nearly as much.

    Unless there is some evidence of molestation or abuse of kids, they should never be in a room with some state functionary unless one or both parents are present.

  37. Where, iron? I’ve had my kidss in schools in three different states in three different areas of the country: West, East, Midwest. No one has ever made mention of anything like informing on parents. One of my friends is the high school principal and she would have told me.

  38. Canada is a nation whose people have nice diction, pleasant manners and, as often as not, are one standard deviation from some sort of 1979 science fiction thing, where appealing people do brutal things to each other to maintain what they perceive as society’s cohesiveness.

    I can’t tell you how many corporate frauds exist in Canada because they don’t have a first amendment there and you can’t say or write anything about them. Of course, there was the Steyn matter as well.

    What a nation of turds. I hope the lot of them slip of the ice and bruise their coccyx.

  39. leigh

    in California a police officer can question a minor at anytime without a parent’s knowledge or permission.

    Indeed, it is standard practice for CPS just about everywhere to come to schools and question children specifically without parental knowledge.

    All it takes is the “professional judgement” of the school admin to believe a child is “at risk” to call in CPS.

  40. Pingback: Know your rights » Cold Fury

  41. Where, iron? I’ve had my kidss in schools in three different states in three different areas of the country: West, East, Midwest. No one has ever made mention of anything like informing on parents. One of my friends is the high school principal and she would have told me.

    Be thankful you’ve had no (apparent) experience in adversarial family law. Any allegation lodged against a parent by or on behalf of a child is considered credible. And in family law innocence before guilt is not at all a right.

  42. From Pablo’s last link:

    Crowley also ordered the school district to pay for the psychiatric exam required before the second-grade boy could return to school.

    Now consider this:

    The impact of mental illness on school success can be far-reaching, which is why identifying our most vulnerable youth and connecting them with care is crucial. School personnel have an important role to play in increasing awareness of teen mental health among students, parents and other school professionals. By recognizing that student achievement hinges on their mental health — and by learning more about how depression, anxiety and other mental disorders affect adolescents — educators can increase their school’s mental health IQ and help safeguard their students’ academic futures.

    Government school breeds ownership. Government school will impair your prior constitutional rights. And Government school is an ally with the civil family court system just as it can be with the local DA, where in some cases the latter two actually have contracts between them.

    And being told by your school about what’s happening?

    TeenScreen Project Coordinator, Kathleen Cigich, was quoted as saying: “We found early on, though, that sending out letters directly to parents is prohibitively time consuming and gets a low response rate. We thought, why not go to students themselves and offer a $5 video store coupon to anyone who brings back a parental consent form within a two-day turnaround period. It works. Our response rate is extremely high.”

    TeenScreen also utilizes a “passive consent” form which requires no written parental approval. The passive consent form is sent home to parents and if they don’t return it TeenScreen considers that the parents approve. TeenScreen officials favor passive consent because they say it boosts their chances of screening kids to 95% as opposed to the written parental consent technique. What if the child forgets to bring the consent form home? What happens if the parent is too busy to refuse in writing? They’ve consented in the eyes of TeenScreen personnel.

    Orwellian? That we’d ever had thought government schooling otherwise is remarkable.

  43. Think “Clockwork Orange.”

    Fairly eerie in its predictions, no?

  44. Pingback: You’re Not a Boiling Frog, But You MIght As Well Be. : The Sundries Shack

  45. What the hell is a “mental health IQ?”

  46. Any allegation lodged against a parent by or on behalf of a child is considered credible.

    Well, unless Dad is making it. He’s probably a rapist anyway.

  47. By recognizing that student achievement hinges on their mental health — and by learning more about how depression, anxiety and other mental disorders affect adolescents — educators can increase their school’s mental health IQ and help safeguard their students’ academic futures…

    …with Ritalin and Adderall.*

  48. Think “Clockwork Orange.”
    Fairly eerie in its predictions, no?

    Anthony Burgess and J. G. Ballard both.

  49. I wonder what the laws are in Ohio?

  50. Apparently lax.

  51. Apparently their murder laws are lax too.

  52. Ohio is a has-been of a state. Once a titan of industry, now filled with hillbillies and gang-bangers. Close proximity to Kentucky and W. Virginia make many of the urban centers abound with city goats, not unlike Baltimore.

  53. “…when he tried to pick up his kids he was told he was charged with possession of a firearm. He was then handcuffed and put him in one of the several squad cars waiting outside…”

    I smell lawsuit. Can you say “false arrest”? I knew you could…

  54. It’s Canada, mojo. Who knows what their procedures allow.

  55. In Canada? I doubt it.

  56. Habeas boomstickus?

    I’d think being accused of possessing a firearm would involve an actual firearm. Or perhaps this is just another case where it is the seriousness of the charge that matters.

  57. HA HA HA oh Canada.

    /o\

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