April 28, 2014

Reaction in America’s Future [Dan Collins]

Back in olden times, many of you will recall, there was a great deal of sturm und drang over Bush the Younger’s use of executive orders and signing statements from the left, and I agreed in part that these short-circuitings of the legislative process in the name of efficiency set bad precedents. At the time, these abuses of process triggered much hyperventilating from leftists, who warned of the rise of the Unitary Executive, but who have almost all fallen silent in the face of the Obama administration’s much greater abuses of process and of the agencies that fall under the control of the executive branch, including the IRS, the Census Bureau, the FBI, Department of Homeland Security (whose abuse as a policy-making and -enforcing operation was enabled by the way it was cobbled together in the wake of 9-11, much in the fashion of the EPA), the EPA, the DoJ (particularly the Voting Section), Border Patrol (which, at least, rebelled in part at the administration’s interference with its mandate to enforce existing laws), customs authorities (raiding Gibson, for example), and numerous other elements of the unelected permanent government that resides in bureaucracies over which Congress has some notional control, in the form of oversight, but which in fact clearly do not feel any sense of obligation to the elected lawmaking branch of government. Prior to Obama’s initial election, I predicted what was certain, given the candidate’s statements regarding his ambitions for himself and government, that he would massively expand our bureaucracy, which he has referred to as his ‘federal family.’ What I did not anticipate at the time was that he and his fellow travelers would be so successful at placing all of these agencies outside Congressional oversight.

I suppose that I could rail on the way that this devolution has been accomplished, particularly with respect to MSM complicity and the use of the charge of ‘racism’ to protect the enormous fraud and abuse perpetrated by the administration, but I will trust that that’s been done very ably here, as it has been done very ably elsewhere, by Bill Whittle, among others. Every utopian project is always bound to fail, particularly when it is established on the absurd idea that, whereas they have always failed before, this one is bound to succeed, due to the special merits of the people effecting the changes. Percival was blessed among the Round Table knights with a vision of the Grail due to his purity of heart, but the conceit that all of the serried ranks of vicious Proggies were comprised of numerous Percivals, whose suffering lay not in the hardships of questing, but in their privileged understanding of the sufferings, real and imagined, of people with differently situated with respect to racial and other classifications, and whose compensatory wisdom, as a result of their ‘compassionate’ (but unpurchased) sympathies, was a special wisdom that could transmute the dross of politics into the revelation of a Golden Age, was always infinitely remote. What is certain is that the present administration has far surpassed Bush the Younger’s in assuming unto the executive a vast array of privileges that it was not meant to encompass, according to the charters of our former liberties.

That Obama should have promised the massive expansion of social welfare programs on the one hand (success!), while on the other promising also to reduce the federal deficit by half in his first term, should have been a signal to the ‘reality based’ that there was a great deal of delusion in the platform; but delusion springs eternal among leftists, and so it is that we are much further down the garden path of economic collapse than we were under the previous administration. The financial burden is insupportable, and as my old posting colleague MP, a professional cruncher of numbers, likes to note, what is insupportable eventually and inevitably will cease to be supported, as in Detroit or Chicago or a number of failed municipalities in California. That’s the problem. The Proggie utopia will eventually collapse, and what follows will, in my view, be what the commies have generally denominated ‘reactionary.’ They believe that the Grail is within their grasp. They have successfully hijacked many of the most influential and powerful institutions of our society. They are feeling rather triumphal about it, even though their Golden Age has not materialized and never will. And their overreaching will, in my view, bring about a new instauration that resembles their dreams not at all.

The elements of ‘liberal fascism’ have been anatomized well by Jonah Goldberg and others. The fascism of the present administration was announced from the very beginning with the bank bail-outs and the ‘stimulus’ funding of a variety of largely failed projects backed by government largess, paid for with more promises laid on the shoulders of America’s dwindling taxpayer classes. Through massive market interventions, such as bringing insurance and pharma companies first to the bargaining table while ramming through ObamaCare, the administration announced in no uncertain terms to the capitalists, who actually know something about wielding capital, that the rules had changed drastically. Subsequent administration actions, backed by congressional grandees such as Pelosi and Reid, demonstrated that openly partisan nastiness was plumbing new depths, and that most of the press was firmly in the tank, though revelations regarding administration surveillance of credentialed reporters caused momentary tutting. We now live in Weimar America, where increasingly it will take a wheelbarrow of scrip to equal the promises once inscribed in a single bill, payable to the bearer by the People of the United States of America, on whose behalf innumerable unkeepable promises have been made to innumerable parties. Too many promises to too many parties is eventually met with skepticism, and we are beyond skepticism, now, and into the territory of denial based on fear. Government is now comprised of promises by promisors who incur no personal obligations commensurate with the pay, privileges, and perks that attend their offices, but who eagerly lay burdens on portions of those supposed to be represented by them. Our administration’s dismal record with respect to our geopolitical and military allies does not inspire confidence, nor does its jaunty dismissal of its obligation to enforce the laws as they exist. In other words, there exists a stark and rapidly growing credibility gap that is ever harder to paper over with empty rhetoric, dissimulation, and distraction–though God knows the Proggies and their MSM enablers are trying. A credit agency expresses dwindling confidence in those promises, and instantly becomes marked as an enemy of state to be browbeaten and threatened into submission, and hardly a media eyebrow gets raised.

Compared with the financial crisis that is coming, the recession and slow putative recovery that have marked the Obama years will seem like halcyon days. In vastly straitened circumstances, American citizens, lied to for so long that they are disoriented, will react, and the institutions that now have become instruments of partisanship will be ready to hand to support a more recognizably ‘traditional’ fascist agenda. Those Proggies who cheered the gutting of our democratic institutions will do what they always do, and exonerate themselves (not what we intended!), even though they cleared the path for the concentration of power that will be necessary to the realization of this ugly future chapter in our national history.

I don’t believe that this scenario is inevitable, even now, but I see it more clearly in my mind’s eye every month. I hope I am wrong. The tit-for-tat strategy played out in the Prisoner’s Dilemma makes sense where the warden is fair minded, but we do not have that situation with the MSM, and iterated over the spans of administrations and our extant two-party system–for instance, by instrumentalizing the IRS as a partisan bludgeon–it is extremely damaging to the ‘fabric’ of our republic. The alternative seems to be to let the more vicious party prevail. So short are our memories, and those of our representatives, that if the GOP wins back the Senate in this cycle we will see Democrats whining about the curtailment of the filibuster, who happily backed circumscribing it just shortly before, and they will feel no compunction and admit no hypocrisy in their about face.

How best to avert this scenario, fellow outlaw, I leave to you.

Posted by vermontaigne @ 8:10am
80 comments | Trackback

Comments (80)

  1. Hey, McGehee. Nice to see you.

  2. One powerful disadvantage of flinging oneself headlong off the cliff is the missed opportunity to reconsider between the penultimate stride and the final leap. It was for that reason I finally relented on the 2012 GOP ticket, assuming in error that the man at its head actually wanted to win.

    In fact, neither he nor the pols who put him at the head of that ticket really wanted to win. Having “their guy” in charge when the fatal plummet takes place would reflect badly on them, and they wouldn’t be caught dead taking blame if they could help it.

    So we are now in that hanging moment when, too late, we realize there is no more level ground ahead of us and frantic denial actually convinces some of us that — hey! we can fly!

    Best hope is that the tide is in, and the sharks are elsewhere. The latter, at least, is unlikely.

  3. Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

  4. Welcome aboard, sailor, I like the cut of your jib!

  5. Dan wrote: …In vastly straitened circumstances, American citizens, lied to for so long that they are disoriented, will react, and the institutions that now have become instruments of partisanship will be ready to hand to support a more recognizably ‘traditional’ fascist agenda….

    The question is not, ‘How many Americans will respond positively to the calls of the white-knighted Fascists?’, but, of those of us who will not, will we be of sufficient number [and possess the Will] to have as much of a chance of defeating the forces aligned against us, as The Founders did, or, at least, be able to gather together and effect a separation?

    As I’ve stated now many times…

    I know not what course others may take, but as for me:
    I will not be a slave; I will either Live Free Or Die.

  6. Made my morning to see your name back in a post title Dan.

  7. Thanks, people. I’ve been a waif for so long.

  8. You describe well the Gnosticism of the secular humanists, my friend…

    A sapiential utterance that seems applicable; “Woe also to you scholars of the law! You impose on people burdens hard to carry, but you yourselves do not lift one finger to touch them. ”

    But, you know, few people really listen to that guy anymore…

    I too think we are nearing an inflection point, but hope that it can be staved off for a bit longer, and that the public concern themselves more with the foundering boat we’re all in, and less with the Kardashians derrieres…

    My regards

  9. It’s the dilemma of our age: the bus is barreling toward the cliff at 90mph. Do you run to the front of the bus, in order to turn the wheel or apply the brakes? Or do you run to the back of the bus, to throw open the emergency exit and bail out, hoping you can survive the 90mph tumble?

    It’s a false dichotomy, of course. Another very good option is to sit there in the middle of the bus and observe how we didn’t have this sort of problem when the bus was the size of a family sedan and only had a 40-horse engine.

  10. Hey, Dan. What are you doing?

  11. I’ve got ten years of service experience and an irreplaceable amount of time and effort has gone into making me what I am.

  12. Sorry. I just had this insanely strong pull to non sequitur, much like some of our trollity.

  13. In our darker hours it kinda looks like the fabric of the republic has been burnt to flimsy carbon cinders, which have subsequently broken apart and wafted away, such that any ‘best’ regarding those memories seem certainly out of the realm of possibility today, i.e. we’re faced with choices of bad and worst. Sometimes, in other words, good regimes simply can’t be had. On the other hand, thus far the sole path to recovery I’ve heard made intentionally dependent on the federal Constitutional republic, hence an ordered, reasoned, deliberative, civil and peaceful process — outside the simple possibility that we and our political leadership forthrightly choose to faithfully interpret and obey that Constitution, which obviously is an act contingent on the virtue of the people involved, which in turn is an awfully ugly jest to be making this early in the day — is Levin’s turn to the Article 5 convention process, admittedly a slow — and possibly too slow — corrective.

  14. I’ve about concluded that the looks on the Beltwayites’ faces when the paper wings they’re wearing crumple and fall off on the way down, will almost be worth the aftermath.

    Paper wings and plastic haloes don’t make you divine, bitches.

  15. The failshit American government is deeply and thoroughly infested with corruption.

    Whether it’s the Lernercunts at the IRS or Meghan’s coward daddy’s pentagon piggies whining about sequester, it’s corruption and whores all the way down.

  16. And the hepatic hamster contingent hateshateshates anybody that dares suggest that there wouldn’t be so much corruption if the institutions that once taught and reinforced virtue were returned to their prior positions of influence.

  17. Whine whine whine

    your feeble and failshit institutions of the enforcement of virtue and the elimination of vice failed for good reasons I’m guessing

  18. They fell so that the likes of you could feel better about yourselves.

    So, no.

  19. Abe Lincoln gave a stern warning against this potential eventuality in his Lyceum Address. Said that if the nation was to die, it would have to be credited with suicide, since sovereignty lay in the hands of the people. His antidote to such a poisoning was education. Our progressive betters heard him, and educated precisely against Lincoln’s aims, his aim at the preservation of the republic. Woodrow Wilson (a far fiercer racist than even his successor IWonPenPhone) knew what the what. FDR knew what the what. LBJ knew what the what. IWonPenPhone is the result of their efforts, a qualified success on those grounds, albeit a ClownDisaster in fact.

  20. And a Rocketman sighting, to boot!

    Woot!

  21. no Mr. McGehee you are not correct you are in fact incorrect

    I’m not sure exactly why these putative institutions of virtue have failed so spectacularly, but I suspect it’s a lot due to the same reason that the fascist rape of our homeland has utterly failed to produce a resistance movement of any heft or efficacy.

    My guess is it’s cause grandkid-raping boomersluts are at the helm just about everywhere you look.

  22. Now that I have become aware that happyfeet can converse intelligently, and chooses not to, I don’t see a point in back-and-forth.

  23. What’s that bitter old joke about the politician saying the result of an election indicated the need for a new electorate? That’s what has been achieved in the miseducation of these generations of people: a new electorate. Teach to decency for the sake of decency and attain a more or less decent people. Teach to theft and corruption for the sake of theft and corruption and attain a more or less indecent people. It’s not that complicated.

  24. that’s ok Mr. Slart I’ve got a big agenda today I can only have one more cup of coffee or so then i have to start getting stuff done

    it’s nice that Mr. Dan is back though I think

    Mr. sdferr nails it I think.

    You Americans tend to entrust your children’s education to dimbulb piggy piggy unioned-up public teachersluts.

    Y’all should give that a re-think.

  25. “happyfeet can converse intelligently”

    Link, please.

  26. “your feeble and failshit institutions of the enforcement of virtue and the elimination of vice failed for good reasons I’m guessing ”

    I blame women abandoning the home.

    I don’t mean that as women should know their place, but as the value of homemakers is vastly under-rated, to society as well as to the family.

  27. women abandoning the home

    Surely the change in life aim has played a role, but just as surely this change is far too recent to account for the political sea-change this nation has undergone. That is, the change in the outlook of women, mothers, is like IWonPenPhone, far more a result of a prior cause than it is a cause itself. Look to nature. What? Where? Oh, that’s right, there is no suchathing.

  28. Well, slart, I guess this is a pretty good place to let anyone interested catch up.

    I went to Wisconsin a couple years back to get the place ready for M&D to have one last summer at their home on the lake. Dad had premonitions that their time at a retirement community was coming to a close, since her dementia was progressing and his macular degeneration was also. Many years prior, they had put down a deposit at an assisted living facility in Wauwatosa, just west of Milwaukee, but before he moved in, he wanted to have that one last summer.

    He was enjoying the summer, and dawdling. In early August, he hollered for assistance from his bathroom, and fortunately, I was there. I got him into a chair, and was getting him a glass of water from the bathroom when he ceased talking mid-sentence. I rushed into the bedroom, and found him slumped in the chair with his eyes rolled back in his head, slid him off, gave him a few breaths (he wasn’t breathing), and he started breathing again. When he came to, he decided maybe the hospital was our destination.

    I could go into the minutia, but in short it was eventually discovered that he had a serious infection behind his clavicle. It took time to find that, because given the sinker episode he had, there was no reason to X-ray up that high. He didn’t develop a fever until he was in for observation, but then he got a resistant general staph infection, and it was found that he had an arterial aneurysm. Blah blah blah. The upshot is that he was in ICU for weeks and weeks, very touch and go, and in one or another hospital room for almost 2 months. The long-term care insurance finally decided on that evidence that perhaps it was time to start paying out claims, but I and my sibs got Mom moved into the assisted care place, and I lived on her couch, not only till Dad got back, but while he did his rehab stint.

    During that time, I got pretty appalled at some of the lack of care at this putatively Catholic facility. They had people painting rocks. Banners in the parking lot proclaimed what a wonderful place the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel had determined this was to work, and I’m sure that’s true, since so little actually was expected of the employees.

    It had been determined that to put the house on the very weak market, it would be best to replace certain 80s touches. I helped some with that, and with supplying what M&D needed at their new digs (from which they’ve since moved), and waited around for contractors, and antiques appraisers, et cetera, and spent a long, very lonely winter out there, in growing depression, before determining it was time to get back to Vermont and my family, which I did a year ago mid-March. I had a short stint with Michelle Malkin’s Twitchy, and turned out not to be the sort of thing that they wanted.

    Here, I resumed Aidan’s care. To refresh your memory, he’s my son with Childhood Onset Schizophrenia, first expressed at the age of 9, who is now 21. Since he’s now an adult, they’ve seen fit to change services for him, offering the suite of possibilities that they would offer someone who was, say, bipolar, or who became schizophrenic at the usual age of late adolescence or early adulthood. Which is to say that none of the social services available suits him very well, as he’s not really acquired the abilities that would permit him to use them, or even to be interested in them. Eventually, I realized that they were happy to depend on his being dependent on me, so I started working with the elderly via a temp service, which led to a local assisted care facility not unlike the one M&D now inhabit, which bought out my contract.

    It’s hard work, especially to be so present to those who need so much so continuously, but I find it very rewarding, wiping their asses, cleaning their rooms, reminding them of their appointments, getting them dressed, and so forth, and not very remunerative, but I feel it is good for my soul, if not particularly my back, and I needed to live less in my head, and more in the world, and it is always therapeutic to come face to face with real extremity.

    So, that is where I am, thanks for asking.

    Shortly before I left Wisconsin, I had another close encounter with madness, in the form of a person from Chicago. Then certain relations wanted me to go to Thailand to bail out one of their sibs who had gotten in a bind over there, and with all the other stresses I just decided I hadn’t the wherewithal to continue blogging. Also, I was out of new things to say, IMO.

    A couple months ago, a former neighbor and friend went off her medication for her bipolar disorder, and was allowed to deteriorate until she’d reached a condition where she definitely posed a danger to herself and others, as announced by her borrowing without permission another neighbor’s car to drive to Burlington on a mission whose purpose even now she can’t explain. She ran a red light. So, finally, she was involuntarily committed. We were pressed into service on an emergency basis as fosters, which means that I have to go to a Thursday night class in order to be social services compliant. Love the kid, he’s a great 16-year-old boy, but we are hither and yon on his behalf, and I get up for work at 4:30. Meanwhile, in her paranoia, the mom is hitting social media to denounce my wife and me, and the eldest of our kids, charging that we owe back taxes, are embezzlers, profiteers for the $21 per day compensation that we get for fostering, that we are lunatic and dangerous, et cetera. She just dropped in, now, to leave magazines for the daughter, who is gone for 2 weeks on her senior trip, having been let go 5 days ago.

    We also took in her dog and cat, so that she wouldn’t have to pay the boarding costs, and tried to help her keep her business afloat, and our reward is calumny and vituperation. I’ve really had it.

    She is under the impression that she’s won $1 million through a Volvo sweepstakes, and that she now owns the 802 area code, having convinced a local IP to run a line from VT Route 116 up the little road on which she now lives, and also that she owns the road itself, in effect. In other words, she is clearly in worse condition now than when she got involuntarily committed.

    On the plus side, the daughter had some very good financial offers from some good colleges, and is still waitlisted at Dartmouth, which has some fine faculty still despite the special snowflake coddlers in the administration, and generally we are in good health, and M&D are at a place that offers better services and amenities and food than their old one, and I’m too busy to be lonely. And I guess that pretty much does it, and if anyone asks I can just direct them here.

  29. You’ve summed it up in the proverbial nutshell, sdferr. By and large the public school system was used like a tool to effect an indoctrination, instead of an actual education.
    With no small assist from a compliant mass media; both with respect to alleged news and the monopoly on pop culture.

  30. no small assist from a compliant mass media

    Which is only to be expected, since these too are products of the “violence [to truth] inherent in the system”.

  31. How unfortunate that the first people marched out onto the farms and told to grow their own food will be the academicians and marketing majors.

  32. I’m envisioning the loveliest herb garden you ever did saw. But you have to be wary of varmints.

  33. Dan, I’m sorry to hear that you’ve had such a hard road to hoe over the past couple of years. What you are doing now is laudable, especially when folks working in such places for so little money aren’t as attentive to their charges needs as they should be; though I also recognize the reality of being short staffed. I recently got educated on this by virtue of my mother-in-laws 3 month stint in rehab…

  34. I mean, really? What could possibly be more upside-down or inside-out than to place the blame on Israel for an Arab demanded, Arab attained judenrein Palestine? The dumbth, it overflows.

  35. I think America is suffering largely as a result of her own success. We’ve reached a point where our poor suffer from obesity; our wars are fought by 1% of the population and have little impact on the rest; our worst diseases are those of old age or sexual irresponsibility. In a world where one’s children aren’t at risk of starving, or being stolen by invaders, or dying of dysentery, one’s perspective changes to that of the leisured, and the old values are forgotten.

    We’re at a point where people make impassioned, heartfelt arguments that people don’t need firearms to protect themselves, because worries about “bad people” are overblown. These same people argue that too many people have too much wealth, as though having the means to assure the comfortable survival of your loved ones was just another form of conspicuous consumption.

    These beliefs stem from an unexamined belief in perpetual security and abundance. They’re symptoms of a society in which food and shelter and safe water and security are givens, simply taken for granted, and those who provide all these essentials are invisible.

    This leaves people like us — the students of history — in an awkward position, because our only opportunity to prove the wisdom of our beliefs requires an “I told you so” situation where millions of people suffer, and no good person wants to be seen as a cheerleader for such outcomes.

    I console myself knowing that I’m not in this fight for the opportunity to rub my counterparts’ faces in it when everything falls apart. I just want to make sure my loved ones don’t suffer as badly as everyone else. Nobody can paint me as a monster for wanting the best for my friends and family.

  36. Thanks, Bob, and I’m sorry you had to find out as you did, though I guess it’s preferable to be forewarned.

  37. “this change is far too recent to account for the political sea-change this nation has undergone”

    I think that too is debatable, but my observation was pointed more to “the institutions that once taught and reinforced virtue” and “their prior positions of influence” that McGehee was speaking to.

    To return to your comment, and your prior observation about education being key, I believe mom going to work leaving junior’s education solely in the hands of government institutions (generally speaking) has had a far greater effect than most imagine.

    But that’s just one facet. Overall, with both parents working, time and energy available for everything else is in short supply. And that’s not even touching on the strain to marriages and the resultant crowd of working single parent families.

    Ah well, what is past is past, and I see no way back.

    Is why the meek shall inherit the earth. The rest of us are going to kill ourselves in our hubris.

  38. If I were to make myself more in-tune, more harmonious to the times, I think I should have to write in place of “we’re faced with choices of bad and worst” “we’re faced with values of bad and worst.” On principle however I refuse: fuck a bunch of harmony with shitty tunes.

  39. As if cued by Dan’s speculation, there are already folks bemoaning the enduring power of the VRWC

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/04/chris-lehane-right-wing-conspiracy-memo-106059.html

    Directly from the mouth of the Clintonista inventor of that turn of the phrase. But it is Politico, after all. Still, they’re not even waiting for any legislative power shift to occur…

  40. Since Werner Dannhauser died this last Saturday and now in written tributes to him links to some of his writings are made, here’s one of those re-linked, written in 1975: On Teaching Politics Today

  41. So in a kind of 2004 pre-gloss on ClownDisasterSecOStateLongFace’s remarks just made, another writing of Werner Dannhauser, a book[s]-review entitled Blaming the Jews.

  42. [A] tool to effect an indoctrination, instead of an actual education.

    I tend to think of it as brainwashing. I also see it as something which unless constantly reenforced by living in a collective bubble will fade away. The only ones who seem to be permanently altered are those who have gone through it for the 18 or so years to get advanced degrees. Even then it is likely that they are then in a bubble all the time associating only with others who feel the same.

    The vocal support for the “Social Justice Warriors” [h/t Larry Correia] can only be maintained by constant stroking of those who say the “right” things, express the “right” feelings and by making all others fear being seen as “other.” Their support is of two types. A tiny very committed and very loud group which in amplified by the MSM and a larger, wider, very shallow support which is there only because they fear not to be.

    That the volume of that small group is getting louder and louder is an indication that the wider shallow support is slipping away. The run of the Frankfort School is coming to a denouement. For good or ill though I remain hopeful that good will win domestically I am much less sanguine about things internationally.

  43. What’s that bitter old joke about the politician saying the result of an election indicated the need for a new electorate?

    “The people have spoken, the bastards.” –Dick Tuck’s concession speech following his loss in the 1966 California State Senate election.

  44. Disentangling the international effects upon domestic tranquility will be an Herculean labor fit for no-one recognizable today though, no?

  45. I blame women abandoning the home.

    I don’t mean that as women should know their place, but as the value of homemakers is vastly under-rated, to society as well as to the family.

    The dirty little secret of femi(commu)nism, is that most women *had* to leave the home, and still do, just to feed the tax nanny state ostensibly looking out for them.

  46. Especially the wily piccalilly pikachu.

  47. Or the domestic effects on the international tranquility.

    My hope is that the good winning through in the domestic will have a salutary effect internationally. The inverse of this administration. My fear though is that it is late and becoming too late for this to not end in fire.

  48. I hope you’re correct geoffb, about the wider support slipping away. Like yourself, I remain hopeful for the domestic situation, but am unfortunately getting the tense international vibe back; the familiar one from the cold war bad old days.

    Which I can’t believe is accidental in any way. If so it would be the greatest comedy of errors in history. Dare I say, dark comedy, without being considered a rascally racist?

    Great observation, and thanks for the links

  49. There is hope, Geoff, is the decentralization efforts occurring around the World – although, it seems, it’s mostly happening in The West.

    If such a trend spreads to the non-First World then this cause a diffusion of attempts to reduce the power of The United States.

    This may be pure wishful thinking on my part because I believe really need to concentrate on domestic issues and because, if we are attacked, the American People will naturally support those in control of the government, and, if that’s the Left, then, well, hello Caesar.

  50. The international scene, it seems to me geoffb, is driven by determinations (and at speeds) that are not suited to our domestic time-frame, i.e., by the policy choices of men like Mr. Putin, or the ruling Mullah theocrats in Iran, who see an opportunity and are equipped to seize it, knowing full well that should the opportunity be foregone it very well may escape altogether.

  51. Yikes!…misspellings and left-out words…apologies.

    Corrected version:

    There is hope, Geoff, in the decentralization efforts occurring around the World – although, it seems, it’s mostly happening in The West.

    If such a trend spreads to the non-First World then this could cause a diffusion of attempts to reduce the power of The United States.

    This may be pure wishful thinking on my part, of course, because I believe we really need to concentrate on domestic issues and because, if we are attacked, the American People will naturally support those in control of the government, and, if that’s the Left, then, well, Hello Caesar.

  52. Now that I have become aware that happyfeet can converse intelligently, and chooses not to, I don’t see a point in back-and-forth.

    I just get tired of the word “failshit.” It makes me want to pour Dip all over any cartoon character I happen to see.

  53. DAN THE MAN!

    Don’t be a stranger no more, k?

  54. This may be pure wishful thinking on my part, of course, because I believe we really need to concentrate on domestic issues and because, if we are attacked, the American People will naturally support those in control of the government, and, if that’s the Left, then, well, Hello Caesar.

    THIS. How did FDR become a 20th century saint?

  55. Benjamin Netanyahu:

    […] In retrospect, all the warning signs were there: the strengthening of the Nazi regime year after year; the horrific anti-Semitic propaganda which grew stronger with each passing month; and the murderous attacks on Jews which began as a trickle and transformed into a huge wave.

    In retrospect, there is a direct line connecting the racial laws and the gas chambers.

    Very few world leaders understood the enormity of the threat to humanity posed by Nazism. Churchill was one of them. Few among our leaders, primarily Jabotinsky, warned against the imminent destruction facing our nation, but they were widely criticized and their warnings were disregarded, and they were treated as merchants of doom and war mongers.

    So I ask: How is it possible that so many people failed to understand the reality? The bitter and tragic truth is this: it is not that they did not see it. They did not want to see it. And why did they choose not to see the truth? Because they did not want to face the consequences of that truth.

  56. Pertinence from Matt Walsh:

    It’s really a fascinating thing, when you think about it.

    Even a culture like ours — a culture dedicated to hedonism and relativism — has to put on a show every once in a while and pretend it has some semblance of a moral standard. It shows you that those philosophers and theologians were actually onto something when they wrote about Natural Law.

    Deep down, in the pit of our being, there exists a need to be good and virtuous; but if being good and virtuous is too hard, then at least we need to find a halfway convincing substitute. Only demons and psychotics would stand and openly proclaim their own evil — the rest of us can act the part, but we still feel the urge to get up and play Morality Charades on occasion.

    We permit and even celebrate most forms of evil and debauchery in our society, so our Moral Outrage energy is stored, ready to be unleashed anytime an old white guy utters something untoward about minorities. Having removed sins like baby-killing, pornography, sex-trafficking, and infidelity from the ‘Things to Get Upset About’ column, this seems to be among the only universally-recognized evils remaining.

    David Thompson, pick up the white (heh) courtesy phone.

  57. Nobody can paint me as a monster for wanting the best for my friends and family.

    Sadly, they can and will.

    Have some stored food that you bought (using your own hard earned money) and put aside for “just in case”? Well then you’re an evil hoarder and clearly want your neighbors’ children to starve to death. That food is now a resource that belongs to the grasshoppers community. For the fairness, comrade.

    Have some gold or silver that you prudently set aside just in case the US dollar takes a tumble (or does a swan dive)? Then you’re one of those evil gold hoarding banksters who is directly responsible for the dollar’s collapse. Once your neighbor turns you in to the 1-800 snitch line, you’ll need to hand over that now illegal hoard to your nearest helpful gov’t representative for proper disposition.

    None of it is true, of course, but that doesn’t mean they won’t do it anyways when the time comes.

    [Cleaned up. I think]

  58. HTML fail in aisle 3. Sheesh.

  59. instantly becomes marked as an enemy of state to be browbeaten and threatened into submission, and hardly a media eyebrow gets raised

    They ALL hate Jeff Emmanuel Goldstein with equal fervor.

  60. I’m not sure exactly why these putative institutions of virtue have failed so spectacularly

    I am.

    The populace is given two options:

    (1) Self-discipline, deferment of pleasure, ==> licit sex limited to marriage, <== industry, thrift, self-reflection, fear of God, Classical Education (Greek, Latin, hard stuff), duty, toil, judgment, etc.

    (2) All that stuff in #1? You don’t hafta do it anymore, because Margaret Mead and Kinsey and the Pill and Vietnam and Mary Jane and FREE ICE CREAM and ROCK AND ROOOOOOLL!

    Given what any moron knows about human nature, why wouldn’t the general populace embrace the path of least resistance, given social permission to do so?

  61. For all you toons out there, that’s dicentra and me and pretty much all the non-toons on the same page. Maybe not necessarily the same verse, but the same page.

  62. I forgot to add the Norman Lear comedies, which were so activist that I, a pre-teen, found their preaching heavy-handed.

  63. As to knowledge of human nature, we ought to once again emphasize the modern doctrine that there is no suchathing, most particularly where the emphasis reveals the usefulness of that modern doctrine to begin with.

  64. Thanks, di, and all.

  65. Welcome back, Dan!

  66. everyone should be on the same page

  67. Dan!!! Welcome back. :-)

    hugs

  68. Well placed DC!

    and nice of you to draw the Rocketman out as well.

    KEEP FIRING!!!

  69. Dan Collins! A sight for sordid eyes, fo’sho! Good to see you gracing the pages.

    The Proggie utopia will eventually collapse, and what follows will, in my view, be what the commies have generally denominated ‘reactionary.’

    But does a Proggie care what is certain to end up ‘reactionary’? Depends on which proggie you ask. Many have sense enough to realize what’s the likely outcome of FORWARD! without sustainability, but they won’t change their seats on this doomed train for any price. To win, finally, and damn the costs.

    The rest, they figure they can always blame Bush.

  70. “I had a short stint with Michelle Malkin’s Twitchy, and turned out not to be the sort of thing that they wanted.”

    Dan,

    You are too good to be bottled up in reporting on 140 character spurts of (semi) consciousness. You need a place to stretch out, with a backup arsenal pointed down-range ;^)

    We missed ya.

  71. reaction thy name is godot

  72. Damn, Dan. Thanks for sharing, though. Not to compare my family situation to yours, but I am relocating to rural Indiana shortly, to a large extent because of family happenings. Fortunately none of those are physical-health-related. So far.

    Coincidentally, my daughter will be attending college in the fall in Wauwatosa, at Wisconsin Lutheran College. Total enrollment: less than 1200. Perfect for her, but we have to be relatively close. We’ll be about 45 minutes from Indianapolis, which is 2 train hops from Milwaukee, or about a 5-hour drive. It’s doable for a weekend trip without taking an airplane, which currently (from Orlando) it is emphatically not.

    We have our own family mental health issues that I may go into in another comment, when I have the time. But although it’s something that affects your life profoundly, it’s not really something you can choose to not address. For me, anyway; clearly, also, for you.

    Anyway, thanks again.

  73. Link, please.

    I referenced that in comments under Jeff’s “What I learned today, redux” thread. Which if you haven’t read that and clicked every last one of the links (to prior articles, all of which you have likely read before), you are missing out. But I don’t expect everyone to read all of my comments, which tend to err on the side of obliqueness, ignorance and glibness. It’s a flaw.

    Anyway, here is one of happyfeet’s comments that show that he can actually communicate like an intelligent adult human. There’s more than one such in that thread. Not overly praising his eloquence, but it does show that unless he’s suffered a profound brain injury, he’s sandbagging.

    Apologies in advance of being informed that happyfeet has in fact suffered a profound brain injury. It’s not out of the question.

  74. I’ve read the links.

    You read his comments as intelligent adult human communication. Okay.

    I read them as come-ons.

  75. At least it shows that once upon a time, he could communicate in decently punctuated complete sentences that are mostly devoid of misogyny.

  76. pickles!

    I made these tasty scrumptious pickle treats the other day for some friends – I still have some left cause of they thought they were disgusting. My family makes these sometimes but me it was my first time ever, but I’m pretty sure I nailed it.

    The problem I think is they’re just not very pretty. The colors are very unpalatable. But anyways they have pretty much zero carbs and I have one of those giant pickle jars to burn through so I think I’m a keep making them just for me.

    It says there in the comments you can use pickled asparagus.

    But I don’t have a giant jar of pickled asparagus what I need to use up.

  77. And if he had come in here muttering unpunctuated, incomplete, misogynistic sentences, he would have found no marks.

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