October 12, 2012

Dog bites Man: Columbia “J-School” hosts uniform pro-Occupy/anti-TEA Party Panel [Darleen Click]

Joseph Pulitzer is rolling in his grave. Harry Stein writes:

According to the most recent Gallup poll, distrust of the mainstream media is at an all-time high, “with 60% saying they have little or no trust in the mass media to report the news fully, accurately, and fairly.” Anyone still wondering why might look into a symposium held last week at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, long the nation’s most prestigious media training ground. Titled “Covering Occupy and the Tea Party,” the panel was organized and moderated by Todd Gitlin, a full professor at Columbia and chair of its Ph.D. program who also happens to be a veteran activist on the left, going back to his days as a founder and early president of Students for a Democratic Society.

It isn’t by chance that the most violent and radical elements of the 1960’s have ended up dominating academia, especially in places where they can manipulate information. SDS may have lost in the streets and in public opinion, but its Marxist acolytes have slithered into places where they can then manipulate the masses they inherently despise.

The deck was stacked from the start by Gitlin’s choice of participants. [...]

Little wonder that the event went exactly as expected. This is not to say that there were bald declarations of support for Occupy or straightforward denunciations of the Tea Party; MSNBC zealotry aside, that’s not how the media mainstream operates. The conversation was reasonable-sounding and often good-humored, laced with anecdotes drawn from the speakers’ front-line experience. Yet what would strike many outsiders as stunning is what Gitlin, his panelists, and most everyone in the audience—composed largely of journalism students—seemingly take for granted: that the Occupy movement, its occasional excesses and counterproductive tactics aside, is at its core good, decent, and noble; while the Tea Party, for all its successes, is fundamentally malign. [...]

In the friendly confines of the J-School’s Pulitzer Building, the panelists made little attempt to hide their sympathies. Encouraged by Gitlin, those who covered Occupy seemed almost to compete in their enthusiasm for the movement.

Read the whole thing.

And if anyone has any doubt about Professor Comrade Gitlin’s commitment to Pravda-style journalism, here is the comment he gave to Fox News about Stein’s article:

Todd Gitlin, a journalism professor and chair of Columbia’s Ph.D. program, moderated the panel, which also included a writer for the Boston Phoenix, a reporter for NBCNews.com, a Ph.D. candidate from Harvard’s School of Government and a New York Times reporter.

Gitlin, who also wrote “Occupy Nation: The Roots, the Spirit, and the Promise of Occupy Wall Street,” declined to comment when reached Thursday by FoxNews.com.

You have nothing to do with news,” Gitlin said. “And you’re wasting my time.”

Forward!

Posted by Darleen @ 8:59am
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Comments (28)

  1. That’s gotta sting. I mean, Gitlin knows a thing or two about nothing to do with news.

  2. That’s so nice of them, they’ve openly declared themselves our enemies. Thank you, we’ll treat you as such…

  3. The US may not care what journalism school thinks is news for much longer. Ask the former East Germans how much their “news” was worth and who trusted it even three decades before the wall came down. The brand of the free press is not at all healthy which is a big part of WHY Fox news is so big.

  4. I asked once before, but don’t recall that I got an answer, so I’ll ask once more:

    When did journalists begin to attend J-School? It used to be you did an undergrad degree in journalism or political science or english and that was it. Now, you go to J-school. Is it because of television and everyone wanting to become a star and not a news reader/reporter?

    At any rate, grad school to write copy for some magazine or work as a stringer seems unlikely to be a good return on one’s investment. Of course, there is a tremendous amount of nepotism in journalism, so there’s that.

  5. What’s really sad is that it takes them a year each to learn Who, What, Where, When, and Why.

  6. I’d say that many of them have yet to learn the basics. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read a newspaper article, particularly small town papers and thought “What the fuck is this supposed to be about? Who is this Miller guy and what does he have to do with the story?”

    Of course, you can always take the Bob Woodward route and just make shit up.

  7. The cream rises to the top on account of it’s so lightweight. It’s really just fat.

  8. “You have nothing to do with news,” Gitlin said. “And you’re wasting my time.”

    Projection! He has it!

  9. Gitlin isn’t teaching anything. He’s indoctrinating his own far-Left ideology into young impressionable ‘students’, hoping for a new crop of like-minded replacement proggs. He has nothing worthwhile to teach except perhaps tricks to not getting caught; but this time, he’s exposed just how mendacious are his techniques.

    Guys like him make me sick.

  10. Gitlin, Ayers, Dohrn and so many others are all old commies who knew each other back in the day.

    They probably exchange Kwanza cards.

  11. I asked once before, but don’t recall that I got an answer, so I’ll ask once more:

    When did journalists begin to attend J-School?

    Don’t know for sure, but I think it was about the same time you started having to go to graduate school to be a librarian.

  12. It’s a good thing you just have to go to trade school to do heating and air-conditioning repairs, plumbing, cutting hair and other blue collar jobs or there would never be anyone around actually working. They’d all be taking enrichment classes to keep their licenses.

  13. I had a friend was a carpenter, loved books, loved to read, so as he got older and his body started to not get along with hard labor so much he started looking into other careers, was thinking librarian might be a cool gig.

    He was shocked to find that you needed a Masters in Library Science to get pretty much any job, and a Phd. to get a good one.

    We spent several beers trying to figure out how the Dewey Decimal system and alphabetical order could take up that many hours of study. Couldn’t really figure it out.

  14. It’s computer databasery isn’t it, with information flows and all kinda new stuff made possible by digitization. It could even be there’s some connection between the introduction of computing to the newsroo. . . . nah, nevermind.

  15. BMoe, libraries these days are much, much more than a collection of books to lend. This pretty much sums up what they see themselves as now:

    The ALA Public Programs Office promotes cultural and community programming as an essential part of library service. Through professional development activities, programming resources, model programs and grant opportunities, PPO supports libraries as they fill their role as community cultural center, a place of cultural and civic engagement, where people of all backgrounds gather for reflection, discovery, participation and growth

  16. My wife and her mother have designated a portion of a large downstairs room in our new house “the library.” Wife ordered bookshelves which arrived this week, and we’re going to be moving books from the old house directly onto the shelves.

    Or we would be, if either of us had ever studied Library Science. We’d probably end up covered with loose pages and globs of binding paste if we tried, amateurs that we are.

  17. I have an mlis I never used it really except for coincidentally

  18. I’ve grouped my cookbooks by cuisine and technique and my bookbooks by topic . Does that count?

  19. Yes it does it counts for a lot now you just have to let the less fortunate pick through them

  20. I don’t like that idea too much. They get the pages dirty.

  21. librarians go through purell like their clients go through the meth amphetamine I bet

  22. Leigh. Columbia started it’s J-school Graduate-only level program in 1912. That didn’t seem to do it.

    I’m going to go with the confluence of the starting of, only the second, Graduate-only level J-school at UC Berkley in 1967, the takeover of offices at Columbia in 1968 by SDS protests which

    Many believe that protest efforts at Columbia were also responsible for pushing higher education further toward the liberal left. These critics, such as Allan Bloom, a University of Chicago professor, believed, “American universities were no longer places of intellectual and academic debate, but rather places of ‘political correctness’ and liberalism.”

    And finally Woodward & Bernstein’s fame from Watergate. All playing into the left’s takeover of the Academe and their then pushing credentialism into most parts of America so as to facilitate their newly minted minions from the colleges access to large swaths of both the private and public sector’s management levels. Journalism being only one such but pivotal.

  23. LBascom says October 12, 2012 at 9:00 pm

    So basically they have become Progressive Indoctrination Centers.

  24. Thanks, geoff. I suspected it was something along those lines.

    Poor Mike Royko (RIP) wouldn’t stand a chance nowadays.

  25. Heh. Todd Gitlin had RTd my first page tweet pointing to this post, but then deleted that, after reading the contents.

    So, I doubled down.

    If Todd wasn’t such a pussy, he would sign up and try to defend his indefensible life of teaching lies and ruining journalism.

  26. I had a friend was a carpenter, loved books, loved to read, so as he got older and his body started to not get along with hard labor so much he started looking into other careers, was thinking librarian might be a cool gig.

    He was shocked to find that you needed a Masters in Library Science to get pretty much any job, and a Phd. to get a good one.

    I have a good friend who had to get a MLS to go with her Ph.D. to get a job.

    We spent several beers trying to figure out how the Dewey Decimal system and alphabetical order could take up that many hours of study. Couldn’t really figure it out.

    I pretty much skipped straight to the drinking as well.

  27. My wife and her mother have designated a portion of a large downstairs room in our new house “the library.” Wife ordered bookshelves which arrived this week, and we’re going to be moving books from the old house directly onto the shelves.
    Or we would be, if either of us had ever studied Library Science. We’d probably end up covered with loose pages and globs of binding paste if we tried, amateurs that we are.

    Group ‘em by size and color of the spine, heaviest books on the bottom.

  28. Spoken like an engineer, Ernst.

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